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Fri November 11th, 2016
Herpes Zoster (Shingles) Market Projection On New Trends And Technical Advancement For 2024
Herpes Zoster also known as zoster or shingles is a painful contagious viral disease which is characterized by blisters in limited area and painful skin rashes. These blisters full of liquid and pus appear on either side of the body or face, left or right in a single stripe. This disease is caused by varicella zoster virus which develops short lived or acute illness named as chickenpox that is usually seen in young adults and children. Patients who never got chickenpox cannot get shingles. The onset of the infection caused by this virus is also seen years after the episode of chicken pox has been resolved as at that time varicella virus is not eliminated completely from the body. Though shingles can develop at any age, people who had chickenpox before the age of 1 and people who are above the age of 60 are more likely to develop this condition. Senior citizens (aged 60 and above). For Any Queries Get Solutions With A PDF Sample : http://bit.ly/2dICzpO People whose immune system is weakened by medications or disease are also likely to develop this condition. Diagnosis usually depends on the signs and synonyms of the person. After the resolution of chicken pox herpes virus remains in latent phase in nerve cell bodies or in non-neuronal satellite cells of the cranial nerve, autonomic ganglia or dorsal root. However, after decades the virus is again activated due to weakening of immune system that might occur owing to fever, aging or stress. The virus may spread from one nerve ganglia to another of an affected skin area. Headache, fever, nausea and malaise are the earlier symptoms of herpes zoster which may also result in incorrect diagnosis. However, these symptoms may be followed by itching, burning pain, oversensitivity or numbness. Over this area rash or band strip is developed which turns into blisters few days later. This blister is filled with fluid that usually takes 2 weeks to 4 weeks to recover.
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