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Presentations

Starting in 2020, LabRoots is introducing our new agenda format. We will be offering a full agenda of scheduled presentations throughout the day of the event; including Keynotes, Panels and Sponsored speakers. We will also be offering unlimited presentations available for immediate On-Demand viewing when the doors to our virtual event open. The content of our presentations will be delivered by experts in industry and academia. We hope you enjoy our new format!

  • MAR 11, 2020 3:00 PM PDT
    PANEL: A Team Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Understanding the Neural Circuit Dynamics Underlying Working Memory and Decision-Making
    Carlos Brody, PhD
    Wilbur H. Gantz III '59 Professor of Neuroscience, Prin...
    Ben Engelhard, PhD
    Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscienc...
    Stephen Keeley, PhD
    Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscienc...
    Marlies Oostland, PhD
    Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in the labs of Prof. Sam...
    Lucas Pinto, MD, PhD
    Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscienc...
    Adrian Wanner, PhD
    CV Starr Fellow at Princeton University
    Ilana Witten, PhD
    Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Pri...
  • MAR 11, 2020 3:00 PM PDT
    PANEL: Anatomical Characterization of Neuron Cell Types in the Mouse Brain
    Giorgio Ascoli, PhD
    University Professor, Bioengineering Department, Volgen...
    Hong-Wei Dong, MD, PhD
    Professor of Neurology, Physiology & Neuroscience, Dire...
    Byungkook Lim, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Division of Biological Sciences, N...
  • MAR 11, 2020 1:30 PM PDT
    Examining the effects of sonication on alpha synuclein pre-formed fibrils (PFFs)
    Speaker: Ariel Louwrier, PhD
  • MAR 11, 2020 1:30 PM PDT
    PANEL: Dissecting the circuit logics in the amygdala underlying emotional learning
    Bo Li
    Professor of Neuroscience, Cold Spring Harbor Laborator...
    Tianyi Mao
    Associate Professor, Vollum Institute, Oregon Health an...
    Haining Zhong
    Scientist/Associate Professor, Vollum Institute, Oregon...
  • MAR 11, 2020 1:30 PM PDT
    PANEL: The Neuronal Mechanisms of Human Episodic Memory: a Multidisciplinary Consortium Utilizing Human Single-Neuron Recordings
    Adam Mamelak, MD
    Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of Epilepsy and Fun...
    Ueli Rutishauser, PhD
    Board of Governors Chair in Neuroscience, Director, Hum...
    Gabriel Kreiman, PhD
    Professor at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hosp...
    Jie Zheng, PhD
    Research Fellow at Boston Children's Hospital
  • MAR 11, 2020 12:00 PM PDT
    PANEL: A Neuroscience-Based Approach to Restoration of Sensorimotor Function After Spinal Cord Injury
    Robert Gaunt, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Rehab Neural Engineering Labs, Uni...
    Michael Boninger, MD
    Tenured Professor & UPMC Endowed Vice Chair, Department...
    Jennifer Collinger, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine an...
  • MAR 11, 2020 12:00 PM PDT
    PANEL: Cracking a Neural Circuit's Function Through High-Resolution Physiology, Connectomics, and Computational Modeling
    Emre Aksay, PhD
    Associate Professor of Computational Neuroscience in th...
    Mark Goldman, PhD
    Joel Keizer Chair in Theoretical and Computational Biol...
    Sebastian Seung, PhD
    Anthony B. Evnin Professor in the Neuroscience Institut...
    Ashwin Vishwanathan, PhD
    Research Associate at the Princeton Neuroscience Instit...
  • MAR 11, 2020 12:00 PM PDT
    PANEL: Thought to action: developing brain machine interfaces to assist individuals with paralysis
    Tyson Aflalo, PhD
    Member of Professional Staff, Executive Director, T&C B...
    Richard Andersen, PhD
    James G. Boswell Professor of Neuroscience,T&C Chen Bra...
    Spencer Kellis, PhD
    Member of Professional Staff, Director of Engineering,...
    Charles Liu, MD, PhD
    Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of the USC Neurores...
  • MAR 11, 2020 10:30 AM PDT
    Innate immunity in chronic neurodegeneration
    Speaker: Michael Heneka, PhD
    Sponsored By: NanoString Technologies
  • MAR 11, 2020 10:30 AM PDT
    PANEL: Deep Brain Stimulation for Depression Using Directional Current Steering and Individualized Network Targeting
    Wayne Goodman, MD
    D.C and Irene Ellwood Professor and Chair of the Mennin...
    Nader Pouratian, MD, PhD
    Professor of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology and af...
    Sameer Anil Sheth, MD, PhD
    Associate Professor, Vice-Chair of Clinical Research, N...
  • MAR 11, 2020 10:30 AM PDT
    PANEL: The Berghia Brain Project: A Team Approach to Understanding Whole-Brain Control of State-Dependent, Motivated Behaviors
    Paul Katz, PhD
    Professor and Director of Neurosciences, Neuroscience &...
    Jeff Lichtman, MD, PhD
    Jeremy R. Knowles Professor of Molecular and Cellular B...
    William Frost, PhD
    Director of the Center for Brain Function and Repair an...
    Deidre Lyons, PhD
    Assistant Professor at the University of California San...
    Vince Lyzinski, PhD, B.Sc, M.Sc, M.Sc.E.
    Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland in th...
  • MAR 11, 2020 9:00 AM PDT
    Keynote Presentation: The BRAIN Initiative and its Promise for the Treatment of Neuro/Mental/Substance Abuse Disorders
    Speaker: Walter Koroshetz, MD
  • MAR 11, 2020 9:00 AM PDT
    PANEL: Neural circuit mechanisms of memory replay
    György Buzsáki, PhD
    Biggs Professor of Neuroscience, NYU School of Medicine
    Attila Losonczy
    Professor of Neuroscience in the Mortimer B. Zuckerman...
    Mark Schnitzer
    Professor, Departments of Biology & Applied Physics Inv...
    Ivan Soltesz
    Professor, Stanford University
  • MAR 11, 2020 7:30 AM PDT
    Keynote Presentation: Interplay between LRRK2 protein kinase and Rab GTPases in Parkinson's disease
    Speaker: Dario Alessi, FRS FMedSci FRSE
  • MAR 11, 2020 7:30 AM PDT
    PANEL: Neuronal Circuit Resilience - How the Brain Manages to Maintain Reliable Behaviors with Unreliable Neurons
    Adrienne Fairhall, PhD
    Professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysic...
    Tim Gardner
    Associate Professor and Robert and Leona Chair in Neuro...
    Carlos Lois, MD, PhD
    Research Professor in Neurobiology at the Division of B...
  • MAR 11, 2020 6:00 AM PDT
    PANEL: Sensorimotor Processing, Decision Making, and Internal States: Towards a Realistic Multiscale Circuit Model of the Larval Zebrafish Brain
    Florian Engert, PhD
    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard Un...
    Jeff Lichtman, MD, PhD
    Jeremy R. Knowles Professor of Molecular and Cellular B...
    Haim Sompolinsky
    Professor of Physics and Neuroscience at Hebrew Univers...
  • MAR 11, 2020 6:00 AM PDT
    PANEL: The Neural Control of Locomotion, an Integrative Approach
    Michael Dickinson, PhD
    Abe and Zarem Professor of Biology and Bioengineering,...
    Anthony Azevedo, PhD
    Post-doctoral Researcher, Department of Physiology and...
    Clare Howard, PhD
    MD/PhD Student, Columbia Vagelos College of Physicians...
    Luke Brezovec
    Graduate student, Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stan...
    Sasha Rayshubskiy
    Post-doctoral associate, Department of Neurobiology, Ha...
    Emily Palmer
    Graduate Student, Graduate Aeronautics Laboratory, Cali...
  • MAR 11, 2020 6:00 AM PDT
    The Rise of Neuroimmunology: Discover the tools & solutions Miltenyi Biotec has to help you navigate experimental challenges during the next revolution in human health.
    Speaker: Josh Mahlios, PhD
    Sponsored By: Miltenyi Biotec
  • Acoustically Targeted Molecular Neuromodulation
    Speaker: Mikhail Shapiro, PhD
  • Bridging the translational gap in rodent behavioral testing using touchscreens and the MouseBytes Open science data repository
    Speaker: Marco Prado, PhD
  • Deciphering the spreading of neuropathologies in neuronal circuits using a high capacity microfluidics platform
    Speaker: Sebastian Illes, PhD
  • Deep brain Recording and Stimulation of Real World Episodic Memory in Humans
    Speaker: Nanthia Suthana, PhD
  • Ethical Challenges in Early Phase Brain Device Research
    Speaker: Lauren Sankary, JD, MA
  • Improving the Precision and Targeting of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
    Speaker: Luis Gomez, PhD
  • Investigating the roles of the Hsp90 co-chaperone, STI1, in neuronal resilience during aging
    Speaker: Rachel Lackie, HBSc.
  • Multi-region Neural Network Models of Adaptive and Maladaptive Learning in the Brain
    Speaker: Kanaka Rajan, PhD
  • Neural Interfaces for Controlling Finger Movements
    Speaker: Cynthia Chestek, PhD
  • Real-Time Monitoring of Striatal GPCR Mediated cAMP Signaling Using Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Sensors
    Speaker: Shana Augustin, PhD
  • Selective D4R Ligands Reveal Structure-Activity Relationships that Engender Agonist Efficacy
    Speaker: Comfort Boateng, PhD
  • Sensing in a dynamic world: what the antennae of the fruit fly can teach us about sensation and the perception of movement
    Speaker: Marie Suver, PhD
  • Understanding the Scourge of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia
  • Deciphering the spreading of neuropathologies in neuronal circuits using a high capacity microfluidics platform
    Speaker: Sebastian Illes, PhD
  • Bridging the translational gap in rodent behavioral testing using touchscreens and the MouseBytes Open science data repository
    Speaker: Marco Prado, PhD
  • MAR 11, 2020 7:30 AM PDT
    Keynote Presentation: Interplay between LRRK2 protein kinase and Rab GTPases in Parkinson's disease
    Speaker: Dario Alessi, FRS FMedSci FRSE
  • Investigating the roles of the Hsp90 co-chaperone, STI1, in neuronal resilience during aging
    Speaker: Rachel Lackie, HBSc.
  • MAR 11, 2020 1:30 PM PDT
    Examining the effects of sonication on alpha synuclein pre-formed fibrils (PFFs)
    Speaker: Ariel Louwrier, PhD
  • MAR 11, 2020 10:30 AM PDT
    Innate immunity in chronic neurodegeneration
    Speaker: Michael Heneka, PhD
    Sponsored By: NanoString Technologies
  • MAR 11, 2020 6:00 AM PDT
    The Rise of Neuroimmunology: Discover the tools & solutions Miltenyi Biotec has to help you navigate experimental challenges during the next revolution in human health.
    Speaker: Josh Mahlios, PhD
    Sponsored By: Miltenyi Biotec
  • NIH BRAIN Initiative: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Neuroscience
    • Advancing Human Neuroscience
    • MAR 11, 2020 12:00 PM PDT
      PANEL: A Neuroscience-Based Approach to Restoration of Sensorimotor Function After Spinal Cord Injury
      Robert Gaunt, PhD
      Assistant Professor, Rehab Neural Engineering Labs, Uni...
      Michael Boninger, MD
      Tenured Professor & UPMC Endowed Vice Chair, Department...
      Jennifer Collinger, PhD
      Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine an...
    • MAR 11, 2020 1:30 PM PDT
      PANEL: The Neuronal Mechanisms of Human Episodic Memory: a Multidisciplinary Consortium Utilizing Human Single-Neuron Recordings
      Adam Mamelak, MD
      Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of Epilepsy and Fun...
      Ueli Rutishauser, PhD
      Board of Governors Chair in Neuroscience, Director, Hum...
      Gabriel Kreiman, PhD
      Professor at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hosp...
      Jie Zheng, PhD
      Research Fellow at Boston Children's Hospital
    • MAR 11, 2020 10:30 AM PDT
      PANEL: Deep Brain Stimulation for Depression Using Directional Current Steering and Individualized Network Targeting
      Wayne Goodman, MD
      D.C and Irene Ellwood Professor and Chair of the Mennin...
      Nader Pouratian, MD, PhD
      Professor of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology and af...
      Sameer Anil Sheth, MD, PhD
      Associate Professor, Vice-Chair of Clinical Research, N...
    • MAR 11, 2020 6:00 AM PDT
      PANEL: The Neural Control of Locomotion, an Integrative Approach
      Michael Dickinson, PhD
      Abe and Zarem Professor of Biology and Bioengineering,...
      Anthony Azevedo, PhD
      Post-doctoral Researcher, Department of Physiology and...
      Clare Howard, PhD
      MD/PhD Student, Columbia Vagelos College of Physicians...
      Luke Brezovec
      Graduate student, Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stan...
      Sasha Rayshubskiy
      Post-doctoral associate, Department of Neurobiology, Ha...
      Emily Palmer
      Graduate Student, Graduate Aeronautics Laboratory, Cali...
    • MAR 11, 2020 12:00 PM PDT
      PANEL: Thought to action: developing brain machine interfaces to assist individuals with paralysis
      Tyson Aflalo, PhD
      Member of Professional Staff, Executive Director, T&C B...
      Richard Andersen, PhD
      James G. Boswell Professor of Neuroscience,T&C Chen Bra...
      Spencer Kellis, PhD
      Member of Professional Staff, Director of Engineering,...
      Charles Liu, MD, PhD
      Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of the USC Neurores...
    • MAR 11, 2020 1:30 PM PDT
      PANEL: Dissecting the circuit logics in the amygdala underlying emotional learning
      Bo Li
      Professor of Neuroscience, Cold Spring Harbor Laborator...
      Tianyi Mao
      Associate Professor, Vollum Institute, Oregon Health an...
      Haining Zhong
      Scientist/Associate Professor, Vollum Institute, Oregon...
    • MAR 11, 2020 3:00 PM PDT
      PANEL: A Team Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Understanding the Neural Circuit Dynamics Underlying Working Memory and Decision-Making
      Carlos Brody, PhD
      Wilbur H. Gantz III '59 Professor of Neuroscience, Prin...
      Ben Engelhard, PhD
      Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscienc...
      Stephen Keeley, PhD
      Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscienc...
      Marlies Oostland, PhD
      Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in the labs of Prof. Sam...
      Lucas Pinto, MD, PhD
      Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscienc...
      Adrian Wanner, PhD
      CV Starr Fellow at Princeton University
      Ilana Witten, PhD
      Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Pri...
    • MAR 11, 2020 12:00 PM PDT
      PANEL: Cracking a Neural Circuit's Function Through High-Resolution Physiology, Connectomics, and Computational Modeling
      Emre Aksay, PhD
      Associate Professor of Computational Neuroscience in th...
      Mark Goldman, PhD
      Joel Keizer Chair in Theoretical and Computational Biol...
      Sebastian Seung, PhD
      Anthony B. Evnin Professor in the Neuroscience Institut...
      Ashwin Vishwanathan, PhD
      Research Associate at the Princeton Neuroscience Instit...
    • Resource and Tool Development
    • MAR 11, 2020 3:00 PM PDT
      PANEL: Anatomical Characterization of Neuron Cell Types in the Mouse Brain
      Giorgio Ascoli, PhD
      University Professor, Bioengineering Department, Volgen...
      Hong-Wei Dong, MD, PhD
      Professor of Neurology, Physiology & Neuroscience, Dire...
      Byungkook Lim, PhD
      Assistant Professor, Division of Biological Sciences, N...
    • Understanding Circuits and Behavior
    • MAR 11, 2020 6:00 AM PDT
      PANEL: Sensorimotor Processing, Decision Making, and Internal States: Towards a Realistic Multiscale Circuit Model of the Larval Zebrafish Brain
      Florian Engert, PhD
      Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard Un...
      Jeff Lichtman, MD, PhD
      Jeremy R. Knowles Professor of Molecular and Cellular B...
      Haim Sompolinsky
      Professor of Physics and Neuroscience at Hebrew Univers...
    • MAR 11, 2020 10:30 AM PDT
      PANEL: The Berghia Brain Project: A Team Approach to Understanding Whole-Brain Control of State-Dependent, Motivated Behaviors
      Paul Katz, PhD
      Professor and Director of Neurosciences, Neuroscience &...
      Jeff Lichtman, MD, PhD
      Jeremy R. Knowles Professor of Molecular and Cellular B...
      William Frost, PhD
      Director of the Center for Brain Function and Repair an...
      Deidre Lyons, PhD
      Assistant Professor at the University of California San...
      Vince Lyzinski, PhD, B.Sc, M.Sc, M.Sc.E.
      Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland in th...
    • MAR 11, 2020 9:00 AM PDT
      PANEL: Neural circuit mechanisms of memory replay
      György Buzsáki, PhD
      Biggs Professor of Neuroscience, NYU School of Medicine
      Attila Losonczy
      Professor of Neuroscience in the Mortimer B. Zuckerman...
      Mark Schnitzer
      Professor, Departments of Biology & Applied Physics Inv...
      Ivan Soltesz
      Professor, Stanford University
    • MAR 11, 2020 7:30 AM PDT
      PANEL: Neuronal Circuit Resilience - How the Brain Manages to Maintain Reliable Behaviors with Unreliable Neurons
      Adrienne Fairhall, PhD
      Professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysic...
      Tim Gardner
      Associate Professor and Robert and Leona Chair in Neuro...
      Carlos Lois, MD, PhD
      Research Professor in Neurobiology at the Division of B...
  • Deep brain Recording and Stimulation of Real World Episodic Memory in Humans
    Speaker: Nanthia Suthana, PhD
  • Ethical Challenges in Early Phase Brain Device Research
    Speaker: Lauren Sankary, JD, MA
  • Sensing in a dynamic world: what the antennae of the fruit fly can teach us about sensation and the perception of movement
    Speaker: Marie Suver, PhD
  • Neural Interfaces for Controlling Finger Movements
    Speaker: Cynthia Chestek, PhD
  • MAR 11, 2020 9:00 AM PDT
    Keynote Presentation: The BRAIN Initiative and its Promise for the Treatment of Neuro/Mental/Substance Abuse Disorders
    Speaker: Walter Koroshetz, MD
  • Improving the Precision and Targeting of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
    Speaker: Luis Gomez, PhD
  • Acoustically Targeted Molecular Neuromodulation
    Speaker: Mikhail Shapiro, PhD
  • Real-Time Monitoring of Striatal GPCR Mediated cAMP Signaling Using Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Sensors
    Speaker: Shana Augustin, PhD
  • Multi-region Neural Network Models of Adaptive and Maladaptive Learning in the Brain
    Speaker: Kanaka Rajan, PhD
  • Behavioral and Psychiatric Disorders
  • Selective D4R Ligands Reveal Structure-Activity Relationships that Engender Agonist Efficacy
    Speaker: Comfort Boateng, PhD
MAR 11, 2020

Neuroscience 2020



The 8th Annual Neuroscience Virtual Conference is now available ondemand. This distinguished, online-only, event is free to attend and brings together the neuroscience community to discuss and present the newest advances in understanding the human brain, neuropsychiatric disorders, and behavorial processes as it relates to the brain function. 

The theme for this years event is Brain Function: In Health and In Disease and includes the following tracks and topics:

NIH BRAIN Initiative: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Neuroscience >>

  • Cell Type Diversity
  • Tool Development
  • Advancing Human Neuroscience
  • Early Career BRAIN Scientists
  • Understanding Circuits and Behavior

Understanding the Scourge of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia >>

  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Neuroprotective agents and their role in ND

Behavioral and Psychiatric Disorders >>

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Schizophrenia
  • Depression

Our virtual conference allows you to participate in a global setting with no travel or cost to you. The event will remain open 6 months from the date of the live event.  The webinars will be available for unlimited on-demand viewing. 

Continuing Education
LabRoots is approved as a provider of continuing education programs in the clinical laboratory sciences by the ASCLS P.A.C.E. ® Program. By attending this event, you can earn 1 Continuing Education credit per presentation for a maximum of 40 credits.

Use #LRneuro to follow the conversation!


Speakers
  • Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
  • Director, Professor of Signal Transduction, University of Dundee
  • Member of Professional Staff, Executive Director, T&C Brain-Machine Interface Center, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology
  • James G. Boswell Professor of Neuroscience,T&C Chen Brain-Machine Interface Center Leadership Chair Director, T&C Brain-Machine Interface Center Division of Biology and Biological Engineering
  • Research fellow, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • University Professor, Bioengineering Department, Volgenau School of Engineering, Neuroscience Program, Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study, Founding Editor-in-Chief, Neuroinformatics
  • Associate Professor of Computational Neuroscience in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Weill Cornell Medicine
  • Post-doctoral Researcher, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington School of Medicine
  • Assistant Professor, High Point University
  • Tenured Professor & UPMC Endowed Vice Chair, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation; Senior Medical Directo, Post-Acute Care, Health Service Division, UPMC
  • Graduate student, Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University
  • Wilbur H. Gantz III '59 Professor of Neuroscience, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
  • Biggs Professor of Neuroscience, NYU School of Medicine
  • Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Neuroscience and Robotics, University of Michigan
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Rehab Neural Engineering Labs, Biomedical Engineer, VA R&D Center of Excellence
  • Abe and Zarem Professor of Biology and Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology
  • Professor of Neurology, Physiology & Neuroscience, Director, Center for Integrative Connectomics, USC Mark and Marry Stevens Neuroimaging & Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, USC
  • Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
  • Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University
  • Professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics and adjunct in the Departments of Physics and Applied Mathematics, University of Washington
  • Director of the Center for Brain Function and Repair and Professor and Chair of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University
  • Associate Professor and Robert and Leona Chair in Neuroengineering at the Knight Campus, University of Oregon
  • Assistant Professor, Rehab Neural Engineering Labs, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
  • Joel Keizer Chair in Theoretical and Computational Biology at UC Davis, and Professor in the Departments of Neurobiology, Physiology, & Behavior and the Department of Ophthalmology
  • Post-doctoral associate, Duke University
  • D.C and Irene Ellwood Professor and Chair of the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine
  • Director of the Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gerontopsychiatry at the University of Bonn, Germany
  • MD/PhD Student, Columbia Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • Director of CNS research,Cellectricon AB
  • Professor and Director of Neurosciences, Neuroscience & Behavior Graduate Program, Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
  • Member of Professional Staff, Director of Engineering, T&C Brain-Machine Interface Center, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology
  • Professor at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital and leads the Executive Function/Memory module in the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines
  • PhD Candidate in Neuroscience, Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario
  • Professor of Neuroscience, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Jeremy R. Knowles Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard
  • Assistant Professor, Division of Biological Sciences, Neurobiology, University of California, San Diego
  • Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of the USC Neurorestoration Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Chair of Neurosurgery and Orthopedics
  • Research Professor in Neurobiology at the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, Caltech
  • President StressMarq Biosciences Inc.
  • Professor of Neuroscience in the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute Columbia University
  • Assistant Professor at the University of California San Diego at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography
  • Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland in the Department of Mathematics
  • Senior Marketing Product Manager, Miltenyi Biotec
  • Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of Epilepsy and Functional Neurosurgery and Co-director of the Pituitary Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
  • Associate Professor, Vollum Institute, Oregon Health and Science University
  • Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in the labs of Prof. Sam Wang at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, and Prof. Michael Brecht at the Humboldt University
  • Graduate Student, Graduate Aeronautics Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
  • Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
  • Professor of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology and affiliated faculty in Bioengineering and Neuroscience, UCLA Medical Center & UCLA Brain Research Institute
  • Canada Research Chair in Neurochemistry of Dementia, Scientist, Robarts Research Institute, Professor Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Neuroscience & Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Post-doctoral associate, Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School
  • Board of Governors Chair in Neuroscience, Director, Human Neurophysiology Research, Associate Professor, Neurosurgery, Neurology & Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
  • Neuroethics Staff, Neurological Institute, Associate Director, Neuroethics Program, Center for Bioethics, Cleveland Clinic Center for Bioethics
  • Professor, Departments of Biology & Applied Physics Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Stanford University
  • Anthony B. Evnin Professor in the Neuroscience Institute and Computer Science Department at Princeton University, and Chief Research Scientist at Samsung Electronics
  • Professor of Chemical Engineering, Investigator, Heritage Medical Research Institute, California Institute of Technology
  • Associate Professor, Vice-Chair of Clinical Research, Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Professor, Stanford University
  • Professor of Physics and Neuroscience at Hebrew University and Director of Swartz Program in Theoretical Neuroscience at Harvard University
  • Assistant Professor, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, NYU Neuroscience Institute, NYU Langone Medical Center
  • Research Associate at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute
  • CV Starr Fellow at Princeton University
  • Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Princeton
  • Research Fellow at Boston Children's Hospital
  • Scientist/Associate Professor, Vollum Institute, Oregon Health & Science University

Show Resources
Speakers

  • Walter Koroshetz, MD
    Director, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
    Biography
      Dr. Koroshetz serves as Director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. He joined NINDS in 2007 as Deputy Director and has held leadership roles in a number of NIH and NINDS programs including co-leading the NIH's BRAIN Initiative, the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience, the Traumatic Brain Injury Center collaboration between the NIH intramural and the Uniformed Health Services University, the Helping to End Addiction Long Term (HEAL) Initiative, the Common Fund's Undiagnosed Disease and the Acute to Chronic Pain Transition programs,.and he was instrumental in founding the NIH Office of Emergency Care Research, Before joining NINDS, Dr. Koroshetz served as Vice Chair of the neurology service and Director of stroke and neurointensive care services at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). He was a professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and led neurology resident training at MGH between 1990 and 2007. Over that same period, he co-directed the HMS Neurobiology of Disease Course with Drs. Edward Kravitz and Robert H Brown. A native of Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Koroshetz graduated from Georgetown University and received his medical degree from the University of Chicago. He trained in internal medicine at the University of Chicago and Massachusetts General Hospital. He then trained in Neurology and Neuroscience at MGH and Harvard Neurobiology focusing on how synaptic mechanisms might contribute to neuronal death. His early research in the lab and clinic focused on Huntington's disease and with the team at MGH performed the first study of pre-symptomatic testing based on linkage analysis. A major focus of his clinical research career was the development of measures in patients that reflect the underlying biology of their conditions. This led to brain the development and validation of imaging techniques including Magnetic Resonance (MR) spectroscopy in Huntington's disease; diffusion/perfusion MR and CT X-ray angiography and perfusion imaging in stroke. These stroke imaging tools are now commonplace in stroke care. Guided by these tools he pioneered acute clot removal for acute stroke patients with large artery occlusion which is now practiced at Comprehensive stroke centers around the country. He played a significant role in the revolution in acute stroke care in the US and the growth of the neurointensive care field.
    • Dario Alessi, FRS FMedSci FRSE
      Director, Professor of Signal Transduction, University of Dundee
      Biography
        Dario's research focuses on unravelling the roles of poorly characterised components which regulate protein phosphorylation or ubiquitylation pathways that are linked to human disease. Dario, obtained a BSc (1988) and PhD (1991) from the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. He carried out postdoctoral at the University of Dundee from (1991 to 1997), where he became fascinated by protein kinases and how they are regulated by insulin, growth factors and other extracellular signals that control almost all aspects of cell biology. In 1997 Dario became a program leader in the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit, where he was appointed as its Director in 2012. Dario has contributed to our understanding of several disease relevant signal transduction pathways including PDK1 (diabetes and cancer), LKB1 (cancer), WNKs (blood pressure). Much of Dario's current work is focused on understanding LRRK2 and how mutations in this enzyme cause Parkinson's disease. Dario's work has contributed to approaches (LRRK2 kinase assay, LRRK2 Ser935 dephosphorylation assay, Rab phosphorylation assays) that have facilitated the development of inhibitors against LRRK2 that may be useful for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Dario's lab contributed to the discovery and validation of the first physiological substrates for the Parkinson's disease LRRK2 protein kinase to be identified showing that LRRK2 directly phosphorylates a subset of the Rab GTPases on a residue lying within the middle of the effector interacting-switch II domain. Dario in collaboration with the Michael J Fox Foundation to better interrogate and understand LRRK2 biology and how it is impacted by mutations, environment and inhibitors that are being developed and assessed. Dario also serves as the Director of the Dundee Signal Transduction Therapy Unit. This is a unique collaboration between scientists at the University of Dundee and pharmaceutical companies, dedicated to accelerating the development of specific inhibitors and chemical probes that target the protein phosphorylation and ubiquitylation system for the treatment of disease, as well as for the study of cell signalling. Dario has published around 260 papers and has a h-index of 131. To peruse Dario's publications see https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=9gPyVfsAAAAJ&hl=en
      • Tyson Aflalo, PhD
        Member of Professional Staff, Executive Director, T&C Brain-Machine Interface Center, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology
        Biography
          For the last 15 years, Tyson Aflalo has studied how the brain controls movements with applications to neural prosthetics. Tyson received his PhD from Princeton University in 2012, studying how natural behaviors are coded in the primate brain. After his PhD, Tyson moved to the California Institute of Technology as a postdoctoral scholar in the lab of Richard Andersen, where he helped initiate the first human clinical trial to directly decode high-level goals from neural implants in tetraplegic individuals. Currently, Tyson is Executive Director of the T&C Chen Brain Machine Interface Center at the California Institute of Technology. In this role, he helps to oversee a clinical study comparing how populations of neurons encode intentions in posterior parietal and primary motor cortices.
        • Richard Andersen, PhD
          James G. Boswell Professor of Neuroscience,T&C Chen Brain-Machine Interface Center Leadership Chair Director, T&C Brain-Machine Interface Center Division of Biology and Biological Engineering
          Biography
            Richard Andersen obtained his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Francisco and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Johns Hopkins Medical School. He was a faculty member of the Salk Institute and MIT before coming to Caltech. Andersen discovered gain-fields, the method the brain uses to transform signals between spatial representations. He also discovered neural signals of intention, proving that they are not sensory in nature but rather reflect the planning of the subject. He has applied this discovery of intention coding to advance research in brain-machine interfaces, showing that paralyzed patients' intentions can be decoded from brain activity to control assistive devices such as computers and robotic limbs. Andersen is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
          • Shana Augustin, PhD
            Research fellow, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
            Biography
              Dr. Augustin received her PhD for her work in Neuroscience from the University of Chicago, IL, USA in 2013, where her work focused on elucidating the role of cyclic AMP in corticostriatal synaptic plasticity. Following her graduate studies, Dr. Augustin joined the Laboratory for Integrative Neuroscience at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism as an Intramural Research Training Award postdoctoral fellow (NIAAA-IRTA). There, she has continued her research examining the cellular mechanisms of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity focusing on the involvement of different striatal D2 dopamine receptor populations in the induction of synaptic plasticity. Also, she has worked on projects investigating the functional role of endocannabinoid transmissions in synaptic plasticity and behavior. Dr. Augustin was the recipient of an NIH BRAIN Initiative advanced postdoctoral career transition award (K99/R00). For her BRAIN Initiative project, she will examine the cellular and subcellular signaling pathways (e.g. cyclic AMP and PKA) during the induction corticostriatal plasticity and during striatal-based behaviors using genetically encoded sensors and optical techniques.
            • Giorgio Ascoli, PhD
              University Professor, Bioengineering Department, Volgenau School of Engineering, Neuroscience Program, Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study, Founding Editor-in-Chief, Neuroinformatics
              Biography
                Dr. Giorgio A. Ascoli received a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Neuroscience from the Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa, Italy, and continued his research at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, to investigate protein structure and binding in the nervous system. He moved to the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University in 1997, where he is University Professor in the Bioengineering Department and Neuroscience Program. He is also founder and Director of the Center for Neural Informatics, Structures, & Plasticity, a transdisciplinary research group that includes biologists, physicists, psychologists, computer scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and physicians. Dr. Ascoli is founding Editor-in-Chief of the journal Neuroinformatics and an editorial board member of several other international journals. He serves on the advisory board of numerous scientific organizations and is Past President of the Potomac Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Ascoli contributed to the establishment of the fields of computational neuroanatomy and neuroinformatics. His own laboratory investigates the relationship between brain structure, activity, and function from the cellular to the circuit level. In the long term, Dr. Ascoli seeks to create large-scale, anatomically plausible neural networks to model entire portions of a mammalian brain, such as the hippocampus. Dr. Ascoli's interests also involve human memory and consciousness.
              • Emre Aksay, PhD
                Associate Professor of Computational Neuroscience in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Weill Cornell Medicine
                Biography
                  Emre Aksay is an Associate Professor of Computational Neuroscience in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Weill Cornell Medicine. He studied Physics at the University of Washington and Princeton University before obtaining a doctorate in Biophysics from New York University while working concurrently in the Biological Computation Division at Bell Labs. He completed his postdoctoral studies in the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton University. Dr. Aksay's research focuses on dynamics in neural systems, with emphasis on the mechanisms underlying learning and memory. His work has been supported by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Searle Scholar Program, the Frueauff Foundation, the Simons Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health.
                • Anthony Azevedo, PhD
                  Post-doctoral Researcher, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington School of Medicine
                  Biography
                    Tony received his B.S. in Engineering Physics at UC Berkeley, and completed his Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington in 2012 in Fred Rieke's lab. There, he studied the molecular mechanisms that make single-photon responses in mouse rod photoreceptors nearly noiseless. He then joined Rachel Wilson's lab in the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School as a post-doc, to take advantage of novel genetic tools in Drosophila melanogaster and to study molecular, cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying mechanosensory and auditory processing. He then returned to the University of Washington to join his friend John Tuthill's lab to work on the sensorimotor circuits controlling walking in the fly.
                  • Comfort Boateng, PhD
                    Assistant Professor, High Point University
                    Biography
                      Dr. Comfort A. Boateng received her PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences specializing in medicinal chemistry from Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL, in 2010. She received national awards such as the Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) fellowship (2005-2008), National Institute of Health (NIH)/Intramural NIAID Research Opportunity (INRO) Award (2008), and Merck & Company - American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Minority Pre-Doctoral Fellowship Award in Pharmaceutical Sciences (2008-2010) and research fellowship in laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases at NIH/NIAID in 2008. Followed by postdoctoral studies in the Medicinal Chemistry Section of the Molecular Targets and Medications Discovery Branch, Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA-IRP) where she was the recipient of the NIDA Scientific Director's Fellowship for Diversity in Research (2011-2014) and NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence (2015). Dr. Boateng joined the High Point University (HPU) Fred Wilson School of Pharmacy as an Assistant Professor in the Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences Department since 2015. Since joining HPU, she has received national awards such as Maharaj Ticku New Investigator Award by Behavior, Biology, and Chemistry: Translational Research in Addiction, NIH/NIDA Diversity Scholars Network program, Organic/Bioorganic-Mentoring Workshop Fellowship by NIH/NIGM. She is serving on numerous local and national committees such as NIH Early Career Reviewer, American Chemical Society-Committee on Minority Affairs (CMA), American Association for Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP)-Medicinal Chemistry Programming Section and AACP HPU faculty delegate including HPU-Intramural Research Award, 2020 AACP-NIA, AFPE, Project-SEED, NIH/NIDA Diversity supplement grants. At the School of Pharmacy, her duties include lecturing on medicinal chemistry principles, neuroscience, anti-infectives, cancer, natural products, and also serving on HPU academic committees and supervising research. She has published in peer-reviewed journals in areas such as CNS disorders and opportunistic pathogens. The focus of Dr. Boateng's current research interest is design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of selective ligands for the dopaminergic receptor systems, as molecular tools and leads toward potential treatment medications for psychostimulant abuse and other neuropsychiatric disorders.
                    • Michael Boninger, MD
                      Tenured Professor & UPMC Endowed Vice Chair, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation; Senior Medical Directo, Post-Acute Care, Health Service Division, UPMC
                      Biography
                        Michael Boninger, MD is a tenured professor and UPMC endowed vice chair for research in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. He is senior medical director for Post-Acute Care for the Health Service Division of UPMC and President for UPMC Innovative Homecare Solutions. Dr. Boninger holds secondary appointments in the Departments of Bioengineering, Rehabilitation Sciences and Technology, Clinical Translational Science Institute, and McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine. He is also a physician researcher for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr. Boninger's central research focus is on enabling increased function and participation for individuals with disabilities through development and application of assistive, rehabilitative and regenerative technologies. Dr. Boninger is the director of the University of Pittsburgh Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury, a National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) Center of Excellence.
                      • Luke Brezovec
                        Graduate student, Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University
                        Biography
                          Luke received his B.S. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Penn State in 2015, and started his PhD in the Stanford Neurosciences program in 2016. He was attracted to neuroscience by its exciting molecular and cellular questions, and is now also exploring systems neuroscience. Currently, he hopes to use in vivo calcium imaging and virtual reality to ask questions about late stage visual processing in Drosophila. Luke's other passion is landscape and architecture photography; he earned a B.A. in Integrative Arts at Penn State and now enjoys photographing the California landscape.
                        • Carlos Brody, PhD
                          Wilbur H. Gantz III '59 Professor of Neuroscience, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
                          Biography
                            Carlos Brody did his Ph.D. in Computation and Neural Systems at Caltech, in John Hopfield's group, then did a computational postdoc in Ranulfo Romo's monkey neurophysiology lab in Mexico (which is Carlos' country of origin). After a short second postdoc at NYU with Tony Movshon, he began his first faculty position at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, where he led a computational group until the allure of exploring cognitive processing in rodents led him to start doing experiments. He moved to Princeton in 2007, and since 2008 has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His group combines high-throughput behavior, electrophysiological recordings, optogenetic perturbations, and computational modeling to understand the neural circuit mechanisms that underlie cognitive processing.
                          • György Buzsáki, PhD
                            Biggs Professor of Neuroscience, NYU School of Medicine
                            Biography
                              György Buzsáki is Biggs Professor of Neuroscience at New York University. His main focus is "neural syntax", i.e., how segmentation of neural information is organized by the numerous brain rhythms to support cognitive functions. He is among the top 1% most-cited neuroscientists, elected member of the National Academy of Sciences USA, Academiae Europaeae and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He sits on the editorial boards of several leading neuroscience journals, including Science and Neuron, honoris causa at Université Aix-Marseille, France and University of Kaposvar, Hungary and University of Pécs, Hungary. He is a co-recipient of the 2011 Brain Prize. (Books: G. Buzsáki, Rhythms of the Brain, Oxford University Press, 2006; The Brain from Inside Out, OUP, 2019)
                            • Cynthia Chestek, PhD
                              Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Neuroscience and Robotics, University of Michigan
                              Biography
                                Cynthia A. Chestek received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 2005 and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 2010. From 2010 to 2012, she was a Research Associate at the Stanford Department of Neurosurgery with the Braingate 2 clinical trial. She is now an associate professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, where she joined the faculty in 2012. She runs the Cortical Neural Prosthetics Lab, which focuses on brain and nerve control of finger movements as well as to high-density carbon fiber electrode arrays. She is the author of 44 full-length scientific articles. Her research interests include high-density interfaces to the nervous system for the control of multiple degree of freedom hand and finger movements.
                              • Jennifer Collinger, PhD
                                Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Rehab Neural Engineering Labs, Biomedical Engineer, VA R&D Center of Excellence
                                Biography
                                  Jennifer Collinger is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh and a Research Biomedical Engineer at the VA R&D Center of Excellence. Dr. Collinger's research interests are related to the use of neuroprosthetics and neurorehabilitation to restore function for individuals with upper limb paralysis or loss. In order to do so, her research program focuses on understanding the motor control of upper limb movements in both able-bodied participants and people with motor impairments. Currently, she is part of a team that is developing intracortical brain-computer interface technology for individuals with tetraplegia. This provides a unique opportunity to study sensorimotor cortical activity during complex motor behaviors.
                                • Michael Dickinson, PhD
                                  Abe and Zarem Professor of Biology and Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology
                                  Biography
                                    Michael Dickinson attended college at Brown University, originally with the intent of majoring in Visual Arts, but eventually switched to Neuroscience, driven by a fascination for the mechanisms that underlie animal behavior. He received a Ph. D. in Zoology at the University of Washington in Seattle in 1991. Dickinson worked briefly at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany, and served as an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Anatomy at the University of Chicago in 1991. He moved to University of California, Berkeley in 1996 and was appointed as the Williams Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology in 2000. From 2010 to 2014, he was the Ben Hall Professor of basic life science in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington. He is now the Abe and Esther Zarem Professor of Biology and Bioengineering at Caltech. Dickinson enjoys cooking, gardening, playing guitar, and torturing his children with Dad jokes.
                                  • Hong-Wei Dong, MD, PhD
                                    Professor of Neurology, Physiology & Neuroscience, Director, Center for Integrative Connectomics, USC Mark and Marry Stevens Neuroimaging & Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, USC
                                    Biography
                                      Dr. Hong-Wei Dong M.D., Ph.D., graduated from medical school in China then received both doctoral and postdoctoral training as a neuroanatomist in Larry Swanson's laboratory at the University of Southern California (USC). He was a founding scientist of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences in 2004, where he made seminal contributions to the brain-wide gene expression mapping project-the Allen Brain Atlas project (ABA). Dr. Dong constructed the flagship Allen Reference Atlas (Dong, Wiley, 2008)-a standard mouse brain atlas that was used as the backbone of the ABA informatics and gene mapping project. Dr. Dong joined UCLA as Assistant Professor in 2006 and established The Mouse Connectome Project (MCP, www.MouseConnectome.org), a pioneering large-scale brain mapping project with the aim of creating a three-dimensional, Google Earth-like, digital Connectome atlas of the C57BL/6J mouse brain. To date, the MCP is an essential open resource for the broader neuroscientific community accessed by investigators worldwide. In 2013, Dr. Dong transitioned to USC and currently is Professor of Neurology, Physiology & Neuroscience as the founder and Director of the USC Center for Integrative Connectomics (CIC, http://cic.ini.usc.edu/) - comprised of neuroanatomists, computer scientists, and web programmers with cross-functional skillsets to facilitate the CIC's unique, interdisciplinary approach to computational neuroanatomy. He serves as an ad hoc reviewer for many neuroscience journals, including Cell, Nature Neuroscience, Nature Methods, Nature Communications, Neuron, Journal of Comparative Neurology, etc. He currently leads and participates in multiple NIH-funded projects within the BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network (BICCN), focused on anatomical characterization of neuronal cell types of the complete mouse brain. Dr. Dong intends to construct the whole brain wiring diagram in order to understand structural and functional organizational principles of the mammalian brain.
                                    • Ben Engelhard, PhD
                                      Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
                                      Biography
                                        Dr. Engelhard obtained his bachelor degree from the Technion - Israel Institute of technology, Haifa, Israel. He then joined the lab of Prof. Eilon Vaadia in The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he got his PhD in computational neuroscience in 2015. During his PhD, Dr. Engelhard investigated cortical dynamics during Brain-Machine -Interface learning, as well as the relationship between oscillatory activity, single-neuron synchrony, and behavior. He moved to the Princeton Neuroscience Institute in 2015 for his post-doctoral research in the laboratories of Dr. David Tank and Dr. Ilana Witten. Dr. Engelhard is interested in the behavioral role of different subcortical neural systems, and in particular in the role of midbrain Dopamine neurons in complex behavior. He uses cell type specific, cellular-resolution deep-brain imaging techniques in mice performing a navigation-based, accumulation of evidence decision-making task.
                                      • Florian Engert, PhD
                                        Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University
                                        Biography
                                          Dr. Engert was originally trained as a physicist at the Ludwigs-Maximilians-Universität in Munich. He transitioned into neuroscience under the mentorship of Tobias Bonhoeffer at the MPI of Neurobiology in Munich and, as a postdoctoral fellow, in the laboratory of Mu-ming Poo at UCSD and UC Berkeley. In early 2001 he moved to Harvard as a junior faculty where he switched his focus to the larval zebrafish as a model system for circuits neuroscience. The general goal of Dr. Engert's current research is the study of larval zebrafish in the context of neuroethology and the evolution of adaptive natural behaviors. To that end he has established a series of quantitative behavioral assays that allow the precise dissection of behavioral algorithms. These assays now provide a framework to generate hypotheses for neural circuit implementations that then can be validated and constrained by whole brain monitoring of neuronal activity, correlated brain wide connectomics, and by targeted interrogation of circuits via optogenetic tools.
                                        • Adrienne Fairhall, PhD
                                          Professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics and adjunct in the Departments of Physics and Applied Mathematics, University of Washington
                                          Biography
                                            Adrienne Fairhall is a Professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics and adjunct in the Departments of Physics and Applied Mathematics at the University of Washington. She obtained her Honors degree in theoretical physics from the Australian National University and a PhD in statistical physics from the Weizmann Institute of Science. She joined the UW faculty in 2004 and now co-directs the University of Washington's Computational Neuroscience Center and the UW Institute for Neuroengineering. She has directed the MBL course, Methods in Computational Neuroscience and co-directs the UW/Allen Workshop on the Dynamic Brain. She has held fellowships from Burroughs-Wellcome, the McKnight Foundation, the Sloan Foundation and the Allen Family Foundation. As a theorist she collaborates with experimentalists working in a wide range of systems, from hydra to primates. Her work focuses on the interplay between cellular and circuit dynamics in neural computation, with a particular interest in adaptive and state-dependent neural coding.
                                          • William Frost, PhD
                                            Director of the Center for Brain Function and Repair and Professor and Chair of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University
                                            Biography
                                              William Frost is the Director of the Center for Brain Function and Repair and Professor and Chair of Cell Biology and Anatomy at The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University. Dr. Frost received his BA in biology from Reed College in 1978, and his PhD in physiology from Columbia University in 1987. His postdoctoral research was at the University of Iowa. He was an assistant professor and then associate professor from 1989 to 1998 at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. His research interests are focused on identifying general principles of neural network function underlying behavior and learning in simple model systems such as gastropod mollusks. Research tools include the use of voltage sensitive dyes to record action potentials in large numbers of neurons during motor programs, paired with analytic methods such as ensemble analysis and dimensionality reduction to understand network function.
                                            • Tim Gardner
                                              Associate Professor and Robert and Leona Chair in Neuroengineering at the Knight Campus, University of Oregon
                                              Biography
                                                Tim Gardner is Associate Professor and Robert and Leona Chair in Neuroengineering at the Knight Campus, University of Oregon. He received an undergraduate degree in Physics from Princeton University and a graduate degree from the Rockefeller University in the program for Physics and Biology. In 2009 he joined the faculty at Boston University where his lab focused on sensory motor learning in songbirds and neural engineering. In 2017 he moved to San Francisco to join the founding team of Neuralink, a company dedicated to building human brain machine interfaces. He continues as scientific advisor to Neuralink and in 2019 joined the Knight Campus at the University of Oregon - a new institute that seeks to accelerate the pace of discovery and application of biomedical science. At the university of Oregon, he works on high resolution 3D printing for biological applications, neural interfaces and sensory-motor learning in songbirds.
                                              • Robert Gaunt, PhD
                                                Assistant Professor, Rehab Neural Engineering Labs, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
                                                Biography
                                                  Robert Gaunt, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Gaunt received his PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Alberta in 2008 and received his postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Douglas Weber at the University of Pittsburgh. He maintains a secondary appointment with the Department of Bioengineering. Dr. Gaunt's primary research interests are in the area of sensorimotor control and the development of neuroprosthetic devices. He works on developing methods to restore and improve bladder function using electrical stimulation of the spinal cord and peripheral nerves and on interfaces with the spinal cord and brain to monitor natural sensory activity and generate artificial sensations. These technologies will enable advanced neuroprosthetic devices with sensory capabilities.
                                                • Mark Goldman, PhD
                                                  Joel Keizer Chair in Theoretical and Computational Biology at UC Davis, and Professor in the Departments of Neurobiology, Physiology, & Behavior and the Department of Ophthalmology
                                                  Biography
                                                    Mark Goldman is the Joel Keizer Chair in Theoretical and Computational Biology at UC Davis, where he is a Professor in the Departments of Neurobiology, Physiology, & Behavior and the Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Science. He received a PhD in Physics from Harvard University in 2000 and did his postdoctoral work in Theoretical Neuroscience at MIT. Dr. Goldman's research uses mathematical modeling and computer simulations to address the cellular, synaptic, and circuit mechanisms underlying neurobiological functions such as memory storage and motor control. His work has spanned problems ranging from cellular biophysics to neural coding, network dynamics, and biological learning rules. He serves as an action editor for the Journal of Computational Neuroscience, is a former Co-Director of the Marine Biological Laboratory's Methods in Computational Neuroscience Course, and in 2014 was appointed as an HHMI Professor.
                                                  • Luis Gomez, PhD
                                                    Post-doctoral associate, Duke University
                                                    Biography
                                                      Luis J. Gomez is a Post-doctoral associate at the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences in Duke University Medical School at Durham, NC, USA, where he is developing optimization and computational techniques for use in improving non-invasive brain stimulation procedures. Previously, he was at the Radiation Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, where he developed fast-integral equation methods for analyzing scattering by highly-heterogeneous media and inverse scattering methods. Dr. Gomez was a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship in 2008, and a National Institutes of Health BRAIN initiative K99/R00 advanced post-doctoral career transition award in 2019.
                                                    • Wayne Goodman, MD
                                                      D.C and Irene Ellwood Professor and Chair of the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine
                                                      Biography
                                                        Wayne Goodman, MD, D.C and Irene Ellwood Professor and Chair of the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine, specializes in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for intractable psychiatric illnesses. He is the principal developer of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the gold standard for assessing OCD, and co-founder of the International OCD Foundation, the major advocacy group for patients with OCD. Prior to joining Baylor, he held senior administrative positions at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, NIMH and the University of Florida. He graduated from Columbia University with a degree in Electrical Engineering, received his medical degree from Boston University School of Medicine and completed his internship, residency, and research fellowship at Yale School of Medicine where he remained on faculty for 7 years. He is currently a Principal Investigator on three grants from NIH's BRAIN initiative including one on developing Adaptive DBS for OCD.
                                                      • Michael Heneka, PhD
                                                        Director of the Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gerontopsychiatry at the University of Bonn, Germany
                                                        Biography
                                                          Michael Heneka completed his medical coursework at the University of Tübingen, Germany in 1996. He obtained his medical degree in 1998 at the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Tübingen on the topic "The effect of polymerized hemoglobin on cardiovascular and renal parameters in septic shock." Thereafter he was a postdoc in the laboratory of Prof. DL Feinstein, at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA. In 2002 he passed the board examination in Neurology and qualified as a professor in Neurology in 2003 with a habilitation thesis entitled "Inflammatory mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease: characterization and development of therapeutic strategies" at the University of Bonn. He was offered a Fellowship in the Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, USA, in the laboratory of Prof. K. Herrup and Prof. GE Landreth in 2004, after which he returned to Germany as a senior physician in the Department of Neurology at the University of Bonn. This was followed by a professorship (C3) for molecular neurology at the University of Münster (WWU) from 2004 to 2008. During this time he was head of the Department of Molecular Neuroscience and of the dementia clinic at the University Hospital MS. In 2008 he was appointed as Professor (W3) for Clinical Neurosciences at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn. Since 2010 Prof. Heneka has been the Neurological Director of the joint Memory Clinic of the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology (Clinical Treatment and Research Center, KBFZ), University Hospital Bonn. Beyond his research, reviewer and teaching duties, Michael Heneka serves as head of the Clinical Research Unit 177 (DFG), is a board member of the BMBF Competence Network "Degenerative Dementias" (KNDD) and is a member of the BONFOR Commission. He is also the Organizing Chair of the biennial conference "Venusberg Meeting on Neuroinflammation". In 2011 he received the Christa Lorenz Award for ALS Research.
                                                        • Clare Howard, PhD
                                                          MD/PhD Student, Columbia Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
                                                          Biography
                                                            Clare received her B.A. in Neuroscience from Amherst College in 2010 and her MPhil from the University of Cambridge in 2011, where she was a Gates Cambridge Scholar. She started the Medical Scientist Training Program at Columbia in 2012, and in 2019 she received her PhD in the lab of Dr. Richard Mann, where she studied how serotonergic neuromodulation confers flexibility on locomotor circuitry. She will earn her MD in 2020, and will go on to pediatrics residency with the ultimate goal of becoming a physician scientist studying how an understanding of the basic mechanisms of neurodevelopment can be used to prevent and treat childhood neurological disorders.
                                                          • Sebastian Illes, PhD
                                                            Director of CNS research,Cellectricon AB
                                                            Biography
                                                              Sebastian joined Cellectricon in 2018 where he leads the company's CNS research. Together with his team, he works to devise novel concepts to generate human and rodent cell-based in vitro models that enable the discovery of new targets and compounds for neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, Sebastian holds a position at the University of Gothenburg where his research team aims to decipher the etiology of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Sebastian's research interests include neural development, neuroinflammation and neuronal circuit function and prior to joining Cellectricon, Sebastian did a Post-Doc at the Institute for Molecular Regenerative Medicine (PMU, Salzburg, Austria) and worked as guest researcher at the Natural and Medical Science Institute, Reutlingen, Germany. He did his PhD at the neurology department at the Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf, Germany, where he, for the first time, combined pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons with microelectrode array technology in pre-clinical research.
                                                            • Paul Katz, PhD
                                                              Professor and Director of Neurosciences, Neuroscience & Behavior Graduate Program, Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Amherst
                                                              Biography
                                                                Paul Katz is a Professor in the Biology Department and the Director of the Initiative on Neurosciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He has been investigating neural circuits underlying rhythmic motor behaviors in invertebrates for over 35 years. He has served as the President of the International Society of Neuroethology and as Co-Director of the Neural Systems & Behavior course at the Marine Biological Lab at Woods Hole. His work on central pattern generators underlying swimming behaviors in nudibranchs showed that serotonin can act as an intrinsic neuromodulator, altering synapses within a circuit. His lab also demonstrated that individual homologous neurons can differ in their functions across species. He is currently the lead investigator on an NIH BRAIN award involving five universities that is using connectomics, transcriptomics, genomics, and optical recording techniques to study the neural basis of behavior in the nudibranch, Berghia stephanieae, which is more amenable to laboratory study than most other species.
                                                              • Stephen Keeley, PhD
                                                                Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
                                                                Biography
                                                                  Stephen received bachelor degrees in Biology and Physics from the University of Rochester in 2011. As an undergraduate, he worked with Alex Pouget and Ruben Moreno-Bote studying information coding in single-neuron biophysical models. He then went to the Center for Neural science at NYU to do a Ph.D. in computational neuroscience, where he worked with John Rinzel and Andre Fenton. His Ph.D. work involved using firing rate models to study competitive gamma oscillations in CA1 and the roles interneuron subtypes play in impacting gamma dynamics. In late 2016, Stephen moved to the Princeton Neuroscience Inistitute to work with Johnathan Pillow as a post-doc. He now develops latent variable models for neural population data. Recent specific projects include developing novel inference methods for Gaussian Process Factor Analytic models with count-observations, as well as extending these Gaussian Process models to analyse stimulus-locked signal information, and trial-by-trail variation in trial-based neural data.
                                                                • Spencer Kellis, PhD
                                                                  Member of Professional Staff, Director of Engineering, T&C Brain-Machine Interface Center, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology
                                                                  Biography
                                                                    Spencer Kellis received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Brigham Young University in 2006, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, both in electrical engineering, from the University of Utah in 2009 and 2012 respectively. In 2012 he joined Prof. Richard Andersen's lab at the California Institute of Technology as a postdoctoral scholar where he helped to build the hardware, software, and regulatory requirements for human clinical trials of brain-machine interfaces in persons with tetraplegia. In 2016, he was appointed a Member of the Professional Staff at the California Institute of Technology, and in 2017 was appointed Research Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. His research interests include neural signal processing, neural stimulation for sensory and therapeutic applications, and shared biological-machine intelligent systems.
                                                                  • Gabriel Kreiman, PhD
                                                                    Professor at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital and leads the Executive Function/Memory module in the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines
                                                                    Biography
                                                                      Gabriel Kreiman is a Professor at Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital and leads the Executive Function/Memory module in the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines. He received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. from Caltech and was a postdoctoral fellow at MIT. He received several awards including the NIH new innovator award and the NSF Career award. His research group combines computational models, behavioral measurements and neurophysiological recordings to develop AI systems constrained and inspired by neural circuits.
                                                                    • Rachel Lackie, HBSc.
                                                                      PhD Candidate in Neuroscience, Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario
                                                                      Biography
                                                                        Rachel Lackie is a senior PhD Candidate in the Neuroscience program at the University of Western Ontario (UWO). Rachel Lackie's research interests during her PhD have been to investigate the roles of a neuroprotective co-chaperone protein in normal aging, and in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease mouse models. Specifically, her research has focused on how this protein regulates protein misfolding and aggregation, as well as neuronal survival. Rachel Lackie has been successful in acquiring competitive external scholarships for the past four years to fund her research, including Ontario Graduate Scholarships and an Alzheimer's Society Research Program Doctoral Scholarship. Rachel Lackie has published 3 peer reviewed manuscripts, including a review paper that was published in 2017 and has been cited over 90 times. Outside of the lab, Rachel Lackie participates in two Science Outreach initiatives. Firstly, she is a Recruitment Coordinator for the Retiring with Strong Minds subcommittee of Strong Bones, Strong Minds, Strong Muscles a UWO graduate student run program that brings graduate students to present their research at retirement residences across London, to allow engagement between researchers and the general public. Secondly, Rachel Lackie is a Reviewing Editor for a neuroscience blog called the Dorsal Column, which highlights published research from UWO, with news articles being written by current Neuroscience graduate students. The blog is geared towards the non-scientific community to let the public know about novel and exciting Neuroscience research occurring at UWO.
                                                                      • Bo Li
                                                                        Professor of Neuroscience, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
                                                                        Biography
                                                                          Bo Li is Professor of Neuroscience at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of British Columbia in Canada and was a postdoctoral fellow at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and the University of California, San Diego. His laboratory focuses on studying the synaptic and circuit mechanisms underlying aspects of motivated behaviors, such as attention, motivation, and learning and memory, as well as synaptic and circuit dysfunctions that may underlie the pathophysiology of mental disorders, including anxiety disorders, depression and autism. His group integrates molecular, genetic, in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology, imaging, optogenetic and chemogenetic methodologies to probe and manipulate the function of specific neural circuits in the rodent brain, and has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying behaviors reinforced by punishment and reward, in heathy as well as in pathological conditions. Dr. Li's research has been supported by awards from the NIH, Dana Foundation, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD), Simons Foundation, Human Frontier Science Program and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
                                                                        • Jeff Lichtman, MD, PhD
                                                                          Jeremy R. Knowles Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard
                                                                          Biography
                                                                            Jeff Lichtman is Jeremy R. Knowles Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard. He received an AB from Bowdoin (1973), and an M.D. and Ph.D. from Washington University (1980) where he worked for 30 years before moving to Cambridge in 2004. He is a member of the Center for Brain Science. Lichtman's research interest revolves around the question of how mammalian brain circuits are physically altered by experiences, especially in early life. He has focused on the dramatic re-wiring of neural connections that takes place in early postnatal development when animals are doing most of their learning. This work has required the development of techniques such as "Brainbow" transgenic mice to visualize neural connections and monitor how they are altered over time. Recently his efforts have focused on developing new electron microscopy methods to map the entire wiring diagram of the developing and adult brain. This "connectomics" approach has as one of its aims uncovering the ways information is stored in neural networks.
                                                                          • Byungkook Lim, PhD
                                                                            Assistant Professor, Division of Biological Sciences, Neurobiology, University of California, San Diego
                                                                            Biography
                                                                              Dr. Lim received a Ph.D. in Neurobiology from University of California, Berkeley, and continued to pursue his research in Stanford University to investigate the neural circuity mechanisms underlying mental disorders. Then, he move to University of California, San Diego as a professor of the Division of Biological Sciences in 2013. He is a recipient of several prestigious awards including NIMH Biobehavioral Research Awards for Innovative New Scientists (BRAINS), Searle Scholar Fellowship, Kingenstein-Simons Fellowship, BBRF Daniel X Freedman Award for Exceptional Basic Research, and so on. He serves as an ad hoc reviewer for scientific journals including Cell, Nature, Nature Neuroscience, Neuron and so on, as well as NIH study sections. His laboratory focuses to understand the neural circuit-mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric diseases including drug addiction, feeding disorder, depressive disorder, social impairment and movement disorder. To address the anatomical and functional properties of neural circuitry involved in these mental disorders, his laboratory applies and develops a variety of molecular strategies together with electrophysiological approaches. Furthermore, his lab has been a leading group in applying cell-type specific or input-specific optogenetic manipulation in vitro and in vivo in pharmacological animal models of human disease.
                                                                            • Charles Liu, MD, PhD
                                                                              Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of the USC Neurorestoration Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Chair of Neurosurgery and Orthopedics
                                                                              Biography
                                                                                Charles Liu completed his undergraduate education in chemical engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and his PhD in chemical/bioengineering at Rice University. He then attended medical school at Yale University before completing his neurosurgical training at the University of Southern California affiliated hospitals. Dr. Liu is engaged in a broad spectrum of efforts that brings together the fields of engineering and clinical medicine to develop systems-level solutions to neurological disabilities. He is currently a professor of neurosurgery, neurology, urology, biomedical engineering, and biokinesiology and physical therapy at the University of Southern California, where he also serves as the Director of the USC Neurorestoration Center. He is also the Chair of Neurosurgery and Orthopedics at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center and serves as Chief Innovation Officer.
                                                                              • Carlos Lois, MD, PhD
                                                                                Research Professor in Neurobiology at the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, Caltech
                                                                                Biography
                                                                                  Carlos Lois is a Research Professor in Neurobiology at the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering at Caltech. Dr. Lois' PhD work demonstrated that the subventricular zone in the brain of adult mice contains stem cells that move long distances through the brain and differentiate into neurons in the olfactory bulb, via a new form of migration that is now known as neuronal chain migration. As a postdoctoral fellow he developed lentiviral transgenesis, an effective method that is now widely used to genetically manipulate animal species that were previously refractory to germline molecular manipulations, such as birds and non-human primates. The Lois lab currently investigates the mechanisms by which the coordinated activity of neurons connected to each other in circuits gives rise to brain function. To address this issue we focus on three complementary questions: (i) what is the wiring diagram of the connections that link neurons together in a circuit?, (ii) how does information flow through a neuronal circuit?, and (iii) what are the mechanisms by which the function of brain circuits remains reliable despite noise?. Honors include the Ellison Foundation New Scholar award, the Packard Foundation Scholar award, and two NIH BRAIN initiative awards. He received his MD from the University of Valencia (Spain), his PhD in neurobiology from The Rockefeller University in 1995, and did postdoctoral work at MIT and Caltech.
                                                                                • Ariel Louwrier, PhD
                                                                                  President StressMarq Biosciences Inc.
                                                                                  Biography
                                                                                    President & CEO of StressMarq Biosciences Inc., a research reagent company with primary product lines in neurodegenerative diseases and cellular stress based in Victoria (BC), Canada. Successful Senior Scientific Business Executive with demonstrated expertise growing markets, revenues, product pipelines and expanding technical organizations into new business opportunities. Educational and business management experience in global markets, with quantified success in moving technical businesses into new international arenas. Author of numerous peer-reviewed articles, and holder of several patents.
                                                                                  • Attila Losonczy
                                                                                    Professor of Neuroscience in the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute Columbia University
                                                                                    Biography
                                                                                      Attila Losonczy is a Professor of Neuroscience in the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University, New York. Dr. Losonczy's research is aimed to uncover neuronal mechanisms of learning and memory by linking synaptic, cellular and microcircuit processes with memory behaviors in the mammalian hippocampus. In order to so, his research uses largescale functional imaging in combination with electrophysiology, cell-type specific manipulations and computational modeling. His research has been supported by awards from the NIH, the McKnight Foundation, the Searle Foundation, the Kavli-Simons Foundation, and the Zegar Foundation. Currently, he is part of a team that aims to understand mechanism of memory replay.
                                                                                    • Deidre Lyons, PhD
                                                                                      Assistant Professor at the University of California San Diego at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography
                                                                                      Biography
                                                                                        Deirdre Lyons serves as an Assistant Professor at the University of California San Diego at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Lyons received her B.A. in Biology from Mount Holyoke College and her Ph.D. in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Lyons's research focuses on cell fate specification and morphogenesis in marine invertebrates including echinoderms and molluscs. As part of the Berghia BRAIN project the Lyons Lab is developing Berghia nudibranchs as a new experimental system for post-embryonic development in molluscs and for studying the embryonic origins of the brain.
                                                                                      • Vince Lyzinski, PhD, B.Sc, M.Sc, M.Sc.E.
                                                                                        Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland in the Department of Mathematics
                                                                                        Biography
                                                                                          Vincent Lyzinski received the B.Sc. degree in mathematics from the University of Notre Dame in 2006, the M.Sc. degree in mathematics from John Hopkins University (JHU) in 2007, the M.Sc.E. degree in applied mathematics and statistics from JHU in 2010, and the Ph.D. degree in applied mathematics and statistics from JHU in 2013. From 2013-2014 he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Applied Mathematics and Statistics (AMS) Department at JHU. During 2014-2017, he was a Senior Research Scientist at the JHU HLTCOE and an Assistant Research Professor in the AMS Department at JHU. From 2017-2019 he was an Assistant Professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics. From 2019-present he is an Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland in the Department of Mathematics. His research interests include graph matching, statistical inference on random graphs, pattern recognition, dimensionality reduction, stochastic processes, and high-dimensional data analysis
                                                                                        • Josh Mahlios, PhD
                                                                                          Senior Marketing Product Manager, Miltenyi Biotec
                                                                                          Biography
                                                                                            Josh Mahlios is a Senior Marketing Product Manager at Miltenyi Biotec, responsible for cell separation technologies and immunology focused applications. In these roles, he drives the awareness and adoption of the reagents and instrumentation specifically developed for both basic and translational researchers investigating the immune system. Prior to joining Miltenyi Biotec in 2016, Josh was a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University.
                                                                                          • Adam Mamelak, MD
                                                                                            Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of Epilepsy and Functional Neurosurgery and Co-director of the Pituitary Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
                                                                                            Biography
                                                                                              Dr. Adam Mamelak is Professor of Neurosurgery, Director of Epilepsy and Functional Neurosurgery and Co-director of the Pituitary Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Dr. Mamelak earned a Bachelor of Science degree in physics at Tufts University and a medical degree at Harvard Medical School. He completed residency in neurological surgery at the University of California at San Francisco and a research fellowship at the California Institute of Technology and Huntington Medical Research Institutes. He was former section head of Neurological Surgery at City of Hope Cancer Center and has been at Cedars-Sinai since 2005. An active researcher, his most significant investigations involve recording and analysis of single unit activity in epilepsy patients undergoing depth electrode monitoring to localize seizures with the goal of better understating the mechanisms of learning and memory. In 1999, Dr. Mamelak was honored with the National Brain Tumor Foundation AANS/CNS Award for Best Translational Research by a Practicing Neurosurgeon. He is also the winner of the Young Investigator Award from the Research Foundation of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Junior Investigator Award from the American Epilepsy Society. He has significant grant support for his research from NIH for several of his research activities.
                                                                                            • Tianyi Mao
                                                                                              Associate Professor, Vollum Institute, Oregon Health and Science University
                                                                                              Biography
                                                                                                Dr. Mao is an Associate Professor at the Vollum Institute. She earned her B.S. degree in Biology from Tsinghua University in 1997, and Ph.D. degree in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 2005. She carried out her postdoctoral training with Karel Svoboda, first at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and then at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research Campus. She established her laboratory at the Vollum Institute in 2010. Dr. Mao's laboratory is interested in elucidating brain circuit mechanisms underlying animal behaviors, such as sensori-motor interactions and motor control, and understanding how these circuits are changed and modulated by disease, brain state, and behavioral context. Dr. Mao's laboratory develops and implements cutting-edge technology including modern anatomy, computation and machine learning, genetics, imaging, and functional circuit mapping in the mouse model to examine the principles governing neuronal connectivity and their regulation. She serves on the Board of Reviewing Editor for eLife, the advisory board of Neuroscience Next, and the Editorial Board of Frontiers in Synaptic Neuroscience and Neural Circuits. She has received three Brain Initiative awards, as well as continuous support from traditional NIH-funding mechanisms.
                                                                                              • Marlies Oostland, PhD
                                                                                                Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in the labs of Prof. Sam Wang at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, and Prof. Michael Brecht at the Humboldt University
                                                                                                Biography
                                                                                                  Dr. Oostland is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in the labs of Prof. Sam Wang at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, and Prof. Michael Brecht at the Humboldt University in Berlin. Her general research aim is to understand neuronal mechanisms underlying behavior. Specifically, she is interested in how cerebellar and neocortical networks perform and interact to transform experiences from the outside world into accurate behavioral output. She completed postgraduate training at the University of Amsterdam, which included a research project at the University of Cambridge. Before joining Brain CoGS in Princeton, she did postdoctoral research at the University of Edinburgh in the labs of Prof. Matt Nolan and Prof. Ian Duguid. Here, she performed in vivo whole-cell patch clamp recordings in awake behaving mice to study neuronal mechanisms in the olivo-cerebellar circuit guiding movement. In January 2018, Dr. Oostland joined the lab of Prof. Sam Wang at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute. She is now combining her expertise of in vivo electrophysiology with his lab's expertise in cognitive function of the cerebellum. She continues to study the neuronal computations in the cerebellum underlying the cognitive process of decision-making, using behavioral paradigms developed by the Brain CoGS team
                                                                                                • Emily Palmer
                                                                                                  Graduate Student, Graduate Aeronautics Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
                                                                                                  Biography
                                                                                                    Emily received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 2018 and started her PhD in Aeronautics at Caltech fall of that year. She was initially drawn to neuroscience to study controls in biological systems which led to an interest in the neural basis of navigation and flight stabilization. Currently, she is working on implementing a model of idiothetic path integration trained on and verified by data from flies performing local search in constrained environments. When she's not in the lab, Emily is most likely at the park with her dog, Margot.
                                                                                                  • Lucas Pinto, MD, PhD
                                                                                                    Post Doctoral Research Associate, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
                                                                                                    Biography
                                                                                                      Dr. Pinto obtained his medical degree from the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 2006. He then did a Master's degree in physiology at the same university, where he studied visual processing in owls with Jerome Baron. Dr. Pinto got his PhD in neuroscience from the University of California, Berkeley in 2014, working in in Yang Dan's laboratory. He investigated how circuits downstream of the sensory cortex participate in perceptual decision-making. He moved to the Princeton Neuroscience Institute in 2015 for his post-doctoral research in the laboratories of Dr. David Tank and Dr. Carlos Brody. Dr. Pinto is broadly interested in neural mechanisms underlying cognition, both at the local circuit level and in terms of large-scale interactions between different brain areas. He uses a combination of recording, perturbation and computational techniques to study decision-making behavior.
                                                                                                    • Nader Pouratian, MD, PhD
                                                                                                      Professor of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology and affiliated faculty in Bioengineering and Neuroscience, UCLA Medical Center & UCLA Brain Research Institute
                                                                                                      Biography
                                                                                                        Dr Pouratian is a Professor of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology and affiliated faculty in Bioengineering and Neuroscience. He has broad yet in depth training in both functional neurosurgery and the acquisition and comprehensive analysis of multiple brain mapping modalities and has published extensively in the field of human brain mapping, comparing human brain mapping signals from multiple modalities, including functional MRI, optical imaging, evoked potentials, electrocortical stimulation mapping, electrocorticography, local field potentials, and single unit recordings. As a neurosurgeon, neuroscientist, and bioengineer, he has the unique perspective and training to integrate these fields and take advantages of the unparalleled opportunities presented by neurosurgery to study human brain function and design novel neurotechnologies. His current focus is understanding the network basis of disease and neuromodulatory therapies and designing novel network-based interventions to address neurological and psychiatric disease.
                                                                                                      • Marco Prado, PhD
                                                                                                        Canada Research Chair in Neurochemistry of Dementia, Scientist, Robarts Research Institute, Professor Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology
                                                                                                        Biography
                                                                                                          Marco Prado is a Canada Research Chair in Neurochemistry of Dementia with strong interest in understanding how molecular and cellular changes in neurodegenerative diseases contribute to protein misfolding and cognitive failure. Marco Prado serves in multiple advisory boards, including the Institute Advisory Board for the Institute of Neuroscience Mental Health and Addiction (CIHR-INMHA, 2018-) and the leadership of BrainsCAN (Western's $66M CFREF), as a Co-Chair of Internal Funding. He is the current Deputy Chief Editors for Reviews for the Journal of eurochemistry, the premier scholar publication in brain chemistry. In recognition for his research, Marco Prado received the prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship (Guggenheim Foundation), a Faculty Scholar Award (University of Western Ontario), the Dean's Research Excellence Award (University of Western Ontario) and a visiting faculty award from the Brazilian Government. His laboratory has been funded consistently in the last 24 years by government and private agencies in three different countries (Brazil, USA and Canada). He has published over 160 peer-reviewed manuscripts and he is currently spearheading an Open Science Repository for high-level cognitive data obtained with mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. This effort will support a community of more than 300 laboratories to increase reproducibility and replicability of cognitive datasets in pre-clinical research.
                                                                                                        • Kanaka Rajan, PhD
                                                                                                          Assistant Professor, Department of Neuroscience & Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
                                                                                                          Biography
                                                                                                            Dr. Kanaka Rajan is a Computational Neuroscientist and an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at Mount Sinai. Her research focuses on integrative theories to describe how behavior emerges from the cooperative activity of multi-scale neural processes. These theories use as building blocks, neural network models flexible enough to accommodate various levels of biological detail at the neuronal, synaptic and circuit levels. They are based on high-quality data from neuroscience experiments and on new and existing mathematical and computational frameworks, derived from machine learning and statistical physics, adapted for biological fidelity. She uses a cross-disciplinary approach that provides critical insights into how neural circuits learn and execute functions ranging from working memory to decision making, reasoning and intuition, putting her in a unique position to advance our understanding of how important acts of cognition, such as perception, learning and memory work. For her work in the field of computational neuroscience, she has received a Young Investigator Award from the Brain and Behavior Foundation (formerly, NARSAD), an Understanding Human Cognition Scholar Award from the James S McDonnell Foundation, a Mindlin Foundation Award, two Research Scholars Awards from the Di Sabato Foundation and the Dyal Foundation, and a Sloan Research Fellowship. Her work has been supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health through the BRAIN Initiative and from the National Science Foundation.
                                                                                                          • Sasha Rayshubskiy
                                                                                                            Post-doctoral associate, Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School
                                                                                                            Biography
                                                                                                              Sasha received his B.S. and M. Eng in Computer Science from Cornell University in 2002. He then worked close to a decade as a software engineer at IBM Research, specializing in parallel computing algorithms for the BlueGene supercomputer project. Eventually, his interests transitioned to the study of computations in neural circuits. In 2019 he defended his thesis work in Rachel Wilson's lab at Harvard, focusing on neural control of steering in walking Drosophila. Currently, his research interest lies at the interface between executive and motor control in Drosophila, which he plans to pursue as a fellow at the Rowland Institute at Harvard starting in the fall of 2020. Sasha's other passions are sailing, classical guitar and travel.
                                                                                                            • Ueli Rutishauser, PhD
                                                                                                              Board of Governors Chair in Neuroscience, Director, Human Neurophysiology Research, Associate Professor, Neurosurgery, Neurology & Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
                                                                                                              Biography
                                                                                                                Ueli Rutishauser, PhD, is an Associate Professor and Board of Governors Chair in Neurosciences in the Department of Neurosurgery, with joint appointments in the Departments of Neurology, Biomedical Sciences, and the Center for Neural Science and Medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Concurrently, he holds a joint visiting faculty appointment at the Division of Biology and Biological Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Rutishauser studied computer science for his BS, and then received his PhD in Computation & Neural Systems from Caltech. After postdoctoral studies at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt, Germany, he started his own lab in 2012. He received the Amercian Epilepsy Society Young Investigator Award (2007), the Ferguson Award (2008), the Troland Award by the National Academy of Sciences (2014), the Prize for Research in Scientific Medicine (2017), and the Freedman Prize for Exceptional Basic Research (2018). In 2014, he was named a Next Generation Leader by the Allen Institute for Brain Science and in 2018 he became an elected member of the Memory Disorders Research Society. He co-edited the textbook "Single neuron studies of the human brain" by MIT press and is one of the principal organizers of the Human Single Neuron meeting. His work has been published in a variety of journals, including Nature, Nature Neuroscience, Neuron, PNAS, Current Biology, PLOS Computational Biology, and Neural Computation. The Rutishauser laboratory is investigating the neural mechanisms of learning, memory and decision-making at the level of single neurons in humans. We are a systems neuroscience laboratory and use a combination of in vivo single-unit electrophysiology in humans, intracranial electrocorticography, eye tracking, behavior, and computational and theoretical approaches. We have helped pioneer the technique of human single-neuron recordings and continue to advance the tools, methods and surgical techniques that allow such experiments.
                                                                                                              • Lauren Sankary, JD, MA
                                                                                                                Neuroethics Staff, Neurological Institute, Associate Director, Neuroethics Program, Center for Bioethics, Cleveland Clinic Center for Bioethics
                                                                                                                Biography
                                                                                                                  Lauren R. Sankary, JD, MA, is Associate Director of the Cleveland Clinic Neuroethics Program and Neuroethics Staff in a joint appointment between the Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute and the Center for Bioethics. Prior to joining professional staff at the Cleveland Clinic, Lauren Sankary completed a post-doctoral research fellowship (F32) funded by the NIH BRAIN Initiative. Her BRAIN Initiative research focuses investigates the experiences of research participants in clinical trials of implanted brain devices, including deep brain stimulation (DBS) and responsive neurostimulation (RNS) devices. This research generates a preliminary understanding of the values and goals underlying research participants' decisions regarding surgical removal of brain implants and the variety of experiences participants have upon exiting clinical trials in neuromodulation.
                                                                                                                • Mark Schnitzer
                                                                                                                  Professor, Departments of Biology & Applied Physics Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Stanford University
                                                                                                                  Biography
                                                                                                                    Mark Schnitzer is an HHMI Investigator and a Professor in Stanford's Departments of Applied Physics & Biology. His work has focused on the innovation and usage of novel optical imaging technologies for understanding how large neural ensembles control animal behavior. In the past 10 years, his lab has innovated several technologies now commercially available, including tiny microscopes small enough to be mounted on the head of a freely moving mouse (Nat. Methods, 2011). This technology won The Scientist's Top Innovation of 2013 and is presently used by hundreds of neuroscience labs worldwide in the USA, Asia and Europe. Schnitzer was a member of the NIH BRAIN Initiative Advisory Committee that wrote the NIH BRAIN 2025 report. His lab uses his optical inventions extensively to study neural circuits, with research interests centering on the understanding of large-scale circuit dynamics underlying cognition and long-term memory, across multiple brain areas and in brain disease.
                                                                                                                  • Sebastian Seung, PhD
                                                                                                                    Anthony B. Evnin Professor in the Neuroscience Institute and Computer Science Department at Princeton University, and Chief Research Scientist at Samsung Electronics
                                                                                                                    Biography
                                                                                                                      Sebastian Seung is Anthony B. Evnin Professor in the Neuroscience Institute and Computer Science Department at Princeton University, and Chief Research Scientist at Samsung Electronics. Seung has done influential research in both computer science and neuroscience. Over the past decade, he helped pioneer the new field of connectomics, applying deep learning and crowdsourcing to reconstruct neural circuits from electron microscopic images. His lab created Eyewire.org, a site that has recruited over 250,000 players from 150 countries to a game to map neural connections. His book Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are was chosen by the Wall Street Journal as Top Ten Nonfiction of 2012. Before joining the Princeton faculty, Seung studied at Harvard University, worked at Bell Laboratories, and taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is an External Member of the Max Planck Society, and winner of the 2008 Ho-Am Prize in Engineering.
                                                                                                                    • Mikhail Shapiro, PhD
                                                                                                                      Professor of Chemical Engineering, Investigator, Heritage Medical Research Institute, California Institute of Technology
                                                                                                                      Biography
                                                                                                                        Mikhail Shapiro is a Professor of Chemical Engineering, a Heritage Medical Research Institute Investigator, and the director of the Center for Molecular and Cellular Medicine at Caltech. The Shapiro laboratory develops biomolecular technologies allowing cells to be imaged and controlled inside the body using sound waves and magnetic fields to enable the study of biological function in vivo and the development of cell-based diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Mikhail received his PhD in Biological Engineering from MIT and his BSc in Neuroscience from Brown, and conducted post-doctoral research at the University of Chicago and the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a Miller Fellow. Mikhail's recent awards include the Packard Fellowship, the Pew Scholarship, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award and the Roger Tsien Award for Excellence in Chemical Biology. More information about the Shapiro Lab can be found online at shapirolab.caltech.edu.
                                                                                                                      • Sameer Anil Sheth, MD, PhD
                                                                                                                        Associate Professor, Vice-Chair of Clinical Research, Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine
                                                                                                                        Biography
                                                                                                                          Sameer Sheth, MD, PhD is Associate Professor of Neurosurgery, Vice-Chair of Clinical Research, and Director of Psychiatric Neurosurgery in the Department of Neurosurgery, Baylor College of Medicine. Clinically, Dr. Sheth specializes in stereotactic/functional neurosurgery, including the surgical treatment of movement disorders, epilepsy, and psychiatric disorders. Dr. Sheth's research focuses on both the study of cognitive neurophysiology,as well as the development of neuromodulatory treatments for neurological and psychiatric disorders.
                                                                                                                        • Ivan Soltesz
                                                                                                                          Professor, Stanford University
                                                                                                                          Biography
                                                                                                                            Ivan Soltesz Ph.D. is the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery & Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. He received his doctorate in Budapest, and conducted postdoctoral research at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California Irvine where he served as department Chair till his return to Stanford. His research focuses on control of inhibitory signaling in brain circuits and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy. He is the author of the book "Diversity in the Neuronal Machine" and the recipient of the Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award, the Michael Prize, and the Research Recognition Award from the American Epilepsy Society.
                                                                                                                          • Haim Sompolinsky
                                                                                                                            Professor of Physics and Neuroscience at Hebrew University and Director of Swartz Program in Theoretical Neuroscience at Harvard University
                                                                                                                            Biography
                                                                                                                              Haim Sompolinsky is Professor of Physics and Neuroscience at Hebrew University and Director of Swartz Program in Theoretical Neuroscience at Harvard University. Sompolinsky's research goal is to uncover the fundamental principles that link the structure, dynamics and functions of the brain, focusing on collective dynamical properties and their emergent computation. He has pioneered the field of Computational Neuroscience, using statistical mechanics, dynamical systems theory, information theory and machine learning, to build mathematical models of neuronal circuits and new methods for analyzing their information processing capabilities. His neuroscience research builds on his early work on the statistical mechanics of complex disordered systems. His contribution to computational neuroscience include: theories of long-term and short-term memory, dynamic and computational principles in recurrent cortical circuits, attractors and attractor manifolds, the ring attractor, balanced networks, neural noise and chaos, neuronal population codes, statistical mechanics of learning in neuronal networks, spike-time based synaptic plasticity and neural learning algorithms, principles of compressed sensing, sparse coding and dimensionality transformation in sensory representation. Among Sompolinsky's recent efforts are: the development of multi-scaling approaches for modeling whole brain structural and functional properties of the zebrafish larvae; elucidating computational principles of neuronal processing across cortical sensory hierarchies; and investigating the interface between Artificial and Biological Intelligence. He also studies neuronal mechanisms of human volition, and explores the impact of physics and neuroscience on the foundations of human freedom and agency.
                                                                                                                            • Nanthia Suthana, PhD
                                                                                                                              Assistant Professor, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
                                                                                                                              Biography
                                                                                                                                Nanthia Suthana, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology, Neurosurgery, and Bioengineering. She completed her B.S. and Ph.D. in Neuroscience and postdoctoral training at UCLA before joining faculty. She uses intracranial recordings and deep brain stimulation in participants with implanted electrodes to understand cognitive function and develop novel therapies. She is a recipient of a NIH Brain Initiative UO1 grant, McKnight Technological Innovations Award in Neuroscience, and the UCLA Keck Junior Faculty Award for her work. She also serves as the Associate Director of the Neuromodulation Division at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience, and the Associate Director of Neuroscience outreach for the Brain Research Institute at UCLA.
                                                                                                                              • Marie Suver, PhD
                                                                                                                                Postdoctoral Fellow, NYU Neuroscience Institute, NYU Langone Medical Center
                                                                                                                                Biography
                                                                                                                                  Marie Suver is a postdoctoral fellow at the NYU Neuroscience Institute, working with Katherine Nagel. She received her PhD from the California Institute of Technology in Computation and Neural Systems, and her undergraduate degrees from the University of Washington in Biology and Computer Science. Marie's research combines electrophysiological, genetic, quantitative behavior and machine learning approaches to understand mechanisms of sensory-motor circuit function. Her research was previously supported by the Leon Levy Foundation and is currently funded by a BRAIN Initiative K99/R00 award from the NINDS.
                                                                                                                                • Ashwin Vishwanathan, PhD
                                                                                                                                  Research Associate at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute
                                                                                                                                  Biography
                                                                                                                                    Ashwin Vishwanathan is a Research Associate at Princeton University at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute. Prior to this, he was a postdoctoral associate at Princeton and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he worked on developing methods to collect and image large scale electron microscopic datasets. His research focuses on studying the mechanisms that can support learning and memory. Ashwin holds a doctorate degree in Bioengineering from the University of Pittsburgh and a bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering.
                                                                                                                                  • Adrian Wanner, PhD
                                                                                                                                    CV Starr Fellow at Princeton University
                                                                                                                                    Biography
                                                                                                                                      After completing his undergraduate studies in Interdisciplinary Sciences with majors in theoretical physics and neuroinformatics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, Adrian joined the labs of Prof. Dr. Richard Hahnloser, at ETH Zurich, and Prof. Dr. Tatyana Sharpee, at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, to work on new algorithms for estimating receptive fields of neurons in the visual cortex of macaque monkeys and the auditory system of zebrafinches. In the course of his doctoral work on the olfactory system of zebrafish in the lab of Prof. Dr. Rainer Friedrich at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research in Basel, Switzerland, Adrian became an expert in multiphoton calcium imaging and large-scale electron microscopy-based circuit reconstruction. In September 2017, Adrian was awarded the C.V. Starr Fellowship at Princeton University to study the neuronal basis of working memory in mice, in collaboration with Prof. Dr. Sebastian Seung and Prof. Dr. David Tank.
                                                                                                                                    • Ilana Witten, PhD
                                                                                                                                      Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Princeton
                                                                                                                                    • Jie Zheng, PhD
                                                                                                                                      Research Fellow at Boston Children's Hospital
                                                                                                                                      Biography
                                                                                                                                        Jie Zheng is a research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital. She received her PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine and her BS from Nanjing University in EE. Currently she is performing her postdoctoral work with Dr. Gabriel Kreiman from Harvard University and Dr. Ueli Rutishauser from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Zheng's PhD research focused on understanding the neural mechanisms of episodic memory in humans using intracranial recordings of local field potentials. During her postdoctoral training, she is continuing this line of research by incorporating both human single neuron recordings and computational modeling to study episodic memory.
                                                                                                                                      • Haining Zhong
                                                                                                                                        Scientist/Associate Professor, Vollum Institute, Oregon Health & Science University
                                                                                                                                        Biography
                                                                                                                                          Haining Zhong is a Scientist and Associate Professor at the Vollum Institute of Oregon Health & Science University. He received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and did postdoctoral training at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and then at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Zhong's lab develops technologies that enable the real-time microscopic visualization of otherwise difficult-to-measure properties associated with brain connectivity and plasticity. His lab also uses these technologies to study the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying animal behavior, learning and memory in rodents. Related to the current presentation, his lab was the first to achieve in vivo imaging of intracellular cAMP/PKA signaling activities with cellular resolution during animal behavior. This allows him and collaborators to investigate when and where the cAMP/PKA pathway and its upstream neuromodulator transmission happen during different animal behaviors. Dr. Zhong is the recipient of the NARSAD Young Investigator Award and NIH Director's New Investigator Award.
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                                                                                                                                        Virtual poster sessions offer the opportunity to present data to a global audience via a PDF poster and video summary, and discuss results with interested colleagues through email. Posters should be submitted as a PowerPoint file. Presentations should incorporate illustrative materials such as tables, graphs, photographs, and large-print text. This content is not peer-reviewed. Submission is free.

                                                                                                                                         

                                                                                                                                        SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT

                                                                                                                                        Enter the following information to this Submission Form:

                                                                                                                                        • Poster Title
                                                                                                                                        • Your Name
                                                                                                                                        • Your Institution
                                                                                                                                        • Your Email
                                                                                                                                        • Abstract describing the poster

                                                                                                                                         

                                                                                                                                        All submitted abstracts will be reviewed and decisions regarding acceptance will be made as abstracts are received. You will be notified within one week of receipt about acceptance. Further details and registration materials will be provided at that time. You do not have to be present in order to have a poster displayed. Only those abstracts approved by LabRoots may display posters at this event.

                                                                                                                                        If accepted, you will also have the opportunity to record a 3-5 minute summary video for each poster. LabRoots will work with each individual to create these videos. Video links and email contact information will be included on each poster displayed.

                                                                                                                                        Questions? Email Posters@LabRoots.com

                                                                                                                                        LabRoots Policy

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                                                                                                                                        C.E. Credits

                                                                                                                                        The speakers below have been approved for CME, CE, or CEU credits. To redeem your credits, locate the presentation you watched and click on the CME/CE/CEU buttons for further direction. For more general information regarding continuing education, the processes to receive credits, and the accreditation bodies, Click here


                                                                                                                                        Committee

                                                                                                                                        To download the Program Committee brochure here.


                                                                                                                                        • Karen David, PhD

                                                                                                                                          Karen David currently oversees the Circuits and Integrated Approaches portfolio of the BRAIN initiative. She joined the Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience cluster in 2013. Over the years, she has served the BRAIN Initiative in various capacities, including as Project Officer ...

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                                                                                                                                        • Kristin Dupre, PhD

                                                                                                                                          Dr. Kristin Dupre serves as a Scientific Content and Communication Strategist in the Office of Scientific Liaison (OSL) at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). OSL aims to provide a seamless flow of information on NINDS research advances and ...

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                                                                                                                                        • Hsiao Yu (Christina) Fang, PhD

                                                                                                                                          Dr. Hsiao Yu (Christina) Fang is a Scientific Program Manager in the NINDS Systems and Cognitive Neuroscience Cluster. She earned her B.S. from National Tsing Hua University, and a Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of Cambridge. Under the guidance of Prof. Alfonso ...

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                                                                                                                                        • James Gnadt, PhD

                                                                                                                                          Dr. Jim Gnadt, NINDS Program Director in Systems and Computational Neuroscience and Team Lead for the NIH BRAIN Integrative and Quantitative Approaches, has worked in systems and cognitive neuroscience and neuroengineering for over 35 years. He has held his current position at ...

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                                                                                                                                        • Nina Hsu, PhD

                                                                                                                                          Dr. Nina Hsu is as a Health Science Policy Analyst in the Office of Scientific Liaison at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at NIH, where she helps to provide a seamless flow of information on NINDS research advances and initiatives to various ...

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                                                                                                                                        • Ariel Louwrier

                                                                                                                                          President & CEO of StressMarq Biosciences Inc., a research reagent company with primary product lines in neurodegenerative diseases and cellular stress based in Victoria (BC), Canada. Successful Senior Scientific Business Executive with demonstrated expertise growing markets ...

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                                                                                                                                        • S. Alex Marshall, PhD

                                                                                                                                          Dr. Marshall is an Assistant Professor in the department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences at North Carolina Central University in Durham, NC. He was previously in the Basic Pharmaceutical Science Department in High Point University's Fred Wilson School of Pharmacy. He ...

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                                                                                                                                        • Paul Mathews

                                                                                                                                          Dr. Paul J. Mathews received his bachelors degree from the University of Oregon where he studied invertebrate behavioral plasticity in the lab of Dr. Nathan Tublitz. He received his Ph.D. in neuroscience from the University of Texas at Austin under the mentorship of Dr. Nace ...

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                                                                                                                                        Help

                                                                                                                                        General LabRoots Questions

                                                                                                                                        email support@labroots.com  

                                                                                                                                        Virtual Events and Webinars

                                                                                                                                        Supported Configurations

                                                                                                                                        • Operating System Internet Explorer Firefox Chrome Safari
                                                                                                                                          Vista IE8+ FF10+ Chrome15+
                                                                                                                                          Windows 7 IE8+ FF10+ Chrome15+
                                                                                                                                          Windows 8 IE10 FF10+ Chrome15+
                                                                                                                                          Mac OS X   FF10+ Chrome15+ Safari5.1+
                                                                                                                                        • Cookie settings: session cookies enabled
                                                                                                                                        • Browser configuration must have JavaScript enabled
                                                                                                                                        • Adobe Flash player 10.2 or later

                                                                                                                                        To watch our webinars and virtual events a modern browser such as Chrome, Firefox, Safari, or an updated version of Internet Explorer is required.

                                                                                                                                        Internet Connection

                                                                                                                                        • A minimum of 100Kbps is recommended for audio-only events
                                                                                                                                        • A minimum of 300Kbps is recommended for speaker on-video events

                                                                                                                                        Computer Equipment

                                                                                                                                        • Screen Resolution: Minimum 1024x768
                                                                                                                                        • Video Card: 65,000 colors minimum
                                                                                                                                        • Sound card and speakers (or headphones) for hearing webcast in full format
                                                                                                                                        • Audio Card: 16-bit minimum
                                                                                                                                        • RAM: 512MB of free RAM

                                                                                                                                        Firewall Protocol

                                                                                                                                        • HTTP on port 80 or HTTPS on port 443
                                                                                                                                        • Adobe RTMP on port 1935, 80, or 443 with automatic fall-back to RTMPT (RTMP tunneling) on ports 1935, 80 or 443
                                                                                                                                        • RTMPE (RTMP encrypted) on ports 1935, 80 or 443

                                                                                                                                        Work-At-Home Attendees

                                                                                                                                        • If a corporate VPN is used, confirm that your network traffic is not directed over the company VPN. If it is, please turn off the VPN while attending the virtual event.

                                                                                                                                        For A Seamless Experience

                                                                                                                                        When using a mobile device, FREE Mobile Apps are available:

                                                                                                                                        - For viewing Webinars:

                                                                                                                                        - For viewing Virtual Events

                                                                                                                                        Attendee Guide

                                                                                                                                        • To learn more about how the virtual event works for attendees, download the Attendee Guide (PDF).

                                                                                                                                        Virtual Event and Webinar Support:

                                                                                                                                        Continuing Education (CME/CE) Support