MAR 17, 2016 7:30 AM PDT

Special Lecturer - NMDAR dysfunction in schizophrenia: Implications for pathophysiology and basic neuroscience

Presented at: Neuroscience
Speaker
  • Director, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Director, Columbia Conte Center for Schizophrenia Research, Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Columbia University College of Physician
    BIOGRAPHY

Abstract

Schizophrenia (Sz) is a major mental disorder that affects ~1% of the population.  Although traditional models of Sz focused on dopaminergic dysfunction, newer models increasingly implicate glutamatergic systems, particularly N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR).    NMDAR models are supported by the ability of NMDAR antagonists (e.g. PCP, ketamine) to induce symptoms and neurocognitive deficits closely resembling those of Sz and by genetic and auto-immune findings. One key deficit related to NMDAR dysfunction in Sz is a failure in the generation of mismatch negativity (MMN).  Deficit in MMN generation have been extensively replicated in Sz and shown to predict functional outcome.  At the physiological level, MMN impairments are related to impaired theta (4-7 Hz) generation within somatomotor networks.  At the cognitive level, deficits in basic auditory processing contribute to impairments in phonological reading and auditory emotion recognition which, in turn, contribute to poor psychosocial function.In the visual system, NMDAR play a preferential role in non-linear gain which, in turn, particularly affects functioning of the magnocellular visual system.  Thus, consistent impairments are observed in ERP (e.g. visual P1) and fMRI response to magnocellular-biased visual static and motion stimuli, while responses to parvocellular-biased stimuli remain relatively intact.  Deficits in magnocellular function in turn lead to impairments in higher order visual information processing, including ability to detect and process facial expression.  As with auditory deficits, basic visual deficits contribute directly to social dysfunction and impaired functional outcome.  Overall patterns of dysfunction in Sz highlight the role played by NMDAR in information processing at the ensemble and network levels. 
 
Learning objectives:

  1.  Understand the role played by NMDAR in basic auditory processing and implications for schizophrenia.
  2. Understand the role played by NMDAR in basic visual processing and implications for schizophrenia

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MAR 17, 2016 7:30 AM PDT

Special Lecturer - NMDAR dysfunction in schizophrenia: Implications for pathophysiology and basic neuroscience

Presented at: Neuroscience

Specialty

Neuroscience

Research And Development

Behavioral Neuroscience

Neurobiology

Research

University

Brain

Neurodegeneration

Autism

Health

Brain Health

Animal Research

Epilepsy

Eeg

Earth Science

Geography

Europe75%

Asia25%

Registration Source

Website Visitors100%

Job Title

Student25%

Medical Doctor/Specialist25%

Medical Laboratory Technician25%

Post Doc25%

Organization

Medical Center25%

Government/public25%

Consultant25%

Manufacturer - Other25%


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