DEC 01, 2022 9:00 AM PST

Black Tea Improves Health Later in Life

WRITTEN BY: Savannah Logan

New research published in the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology has shown that habitual intake of foods high in flavonoids, such as black tea, leads to less abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) for women later in life.

AAC is a major predictor of vascular events such as heart attacks and strokes, and previous research has shown that intake of apples, which are high in flavonoids, is associated with lower AAC. AAC has also been shown to accurately predict late-life dementia. This study sought to determine whether overall flavonoid intake and habitual intake of high-flavonoid foods are also associated with lower AAC.

The study included 881 older women (median age of 80 years) participating in the Perth Longitudinal Study of Aging Women. Their flavonoid intake was determined through food-frequency questionnaires, and their AAC was categorized as “extensive” or “less extensive” based on imaging. After adjusting for confounders such as demographics, diet, and lifestyle, the results showed that participants with high levels of flavonoids in their diets were much less likely to have extensive AAC. Participants in the top quartile of total flavonoid intake had 36% lower odds of extensive AAC compared to those in the bottom quartile. Additionally, higher intake of black tea (the top source of overall flavonoid intake) was associated with a significantly lower risk of having extensive AAC.

One of the study’s authors noted that the majority of total flavonoid intake is often generated by a relatively small group of foods and beverages that are high in flavonoids. Examples of such foods include black tea, green tea, blueberries, apples, strawberries, oranges, raisins, grapes, and dark chocolate.

Sources: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, Science Daily

About the Author
Doctorate (PhD)
Savannah (she/her) is a scientific writer specializing in cardiology at Labroots. Her background is in medical writing with significant experience in obesity, oncology, and infectious diseases. She has conducted research in microbial biophysics, optics, and education. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Oregon.
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