APR 23, 2019 10:03 PM PDT

Walking on Water

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

In a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers have found a new method of water surface skipping--termed "water walking." The study involves unraveling the physics of how elastic spheres interact with water as well as laying the foundation for future designs of water-walking drones. The research team used high-speed cameras to record elastomeric spheres “walking” in a tank of water. The ‘water walking’ is via elastic spheres gaining speed over the first several impacts, causing the sphere to maintain a deformed, oblong shape.

"Although this has been a long study, the new modes we discovered make it easier for us to envision using the technology for practical uses like water-walking drones," says Utah State University Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Tadd Truscott.

Source: Utah State University

About the Author
  • Nouran earned her BS and MS in Biology at IUPUI and currently shares her love of science by teaching. She enjoys writing on various topics as well including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
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