NOV 05, 2020 6:00 AM PST

No, Gravity Doesn't Affect How Bubbles Collapse

WRITTEN BY: Daniel Duan

The ubiquitous presence of bubbles makes them a common phenomenon, but interestingly our understanding of this globular existence is still quite limited.

A team of scientists from Boston University, Princeton University, and MIT challenged a well-accepted hypothesis - Gravity is the driving force in bubbles collapsing and made a surprising discovery.  

They generated bubbles that point upside down and then captured the moments of their destructions using a slow motion-imaging technique. Instead of imploding toward the ground, the flipped bubbles collapsed inward toward its attaching surface, the same way as their upright counterparts. 

By closely watching the moments of bursting and experimenting with different bubble-forming parameters, they found out that surface tension is the main driving force behind the disappearing bubbles. Also, they determined that the collapsing speed is approximately equivalent to the capillary force divided by the viscous force on the bubble surface.

The researchers hoped that the new knowledge they acquired could help improve our manipulation of bubbles, either increasing or decreasing their presence for different scenarios.

This discovery is published in the journal Science as a cover page article.

Source: C&EN via Youtube

About the Author
  • Graduated with a bachelor degree in Pharmaceutical Science and a master degree in neuropharmacology, Daniel is a radiopharmaceutical and radiobiology expert based in Ottawa, Canada. With years of experience in biomedical R&D, Daniel is very into writing. He is constantly fascinated by what's happening in the world of science. He hopes to capture the public's interest and promote scientific literacy with his trending news articles. The recurring topics in his Chemistry & Physics trending news section include alternative energy, material science, theoretical physics, medical imaging, and green chemistry.
You May Also Like
MAY 21, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
New water filtration process mimics our bodies
MAY 21, 2021
New water filtration process mimics our bodies
An engineering team from The University of Austin has collaborated with international scientists to develop a process th ...
AUG 08, 2021
Earth & The Environment
The Surprising Source of Life in the Arctic
AUG 08, 2021
The Surprising Source of Life in the Arctic
According to a new study published in Nature Communications last January, life in the waters of the Arctic Oce ...
AUG 19, 2021
Space & Astronomy
Researchers Observe the Birth of New Solar Systems
AUG 19, 2021
Researchers Observe the Birth of New Solar Systems
Astronomers are gaining new insights on how our solar system was born from observations of a nearby star-forming region ...
AUG 26, 2021
Immunology
Sugar-Coating Organs Stops Them From Getting Rejected
AUG 26, 2021
Sugar-Coating Organs Stops Them From Getting Rejected
Once organ failure patients receive the gift of a transplant, they face a life-long threat of immune rejection. Their im ...
AUG 25, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
Self-Assembling Molecules: A Potential "One-Size-Fits-All" Cancer Therapy
AUG 25, 2021
Self-Assembling Molecules: A Potential "One-Size-Fits-All" Cancer Therapy
A new study from the University of Huddersfield shows promising breakthroughs on the use of self-assembling molecules as ...
SEP 02, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
The Future of Room-Temperature Superconductors
SEP 02, 2021
The Future of Room-Temperature Superconductors
It begins with two diamonds, a pinch of carbon, sulfur, and a whiff of hydrogen gas. The result is the world’s fir ...
Loading Comments...