MAR 02, 2021 6:32 AM PST

Using materials science to fight SARS-CoV-2

Materials scientists around the world have been hard at work designing and developing materials with antiviral properties in an effort to play their part to stop the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Japanese researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, and Nara Medical University now report their achievements in a new study published in the journal Material Letters.

The team, led by Akira Nakajima of Tokyo Institute of Technology's Department of Materials Science and Engineering, says that they have developed a material called cerium molybdate (γ-Ce2Mo3O13 or CMO), which they have demonstrated has high antiviral activity against coronavirus. Unlike many other inorganic antimicrobial agents that are made with metals and photocatalysts, CMO is not prone to corrosion and does not require light.

The material is composed of the rare earth element cerium (Ce) with the antibacterial agent molybdenum (Mo).  The results of the pairing are two kinds of cerium molybdate as a powder, one of which proved to be particularly apt at killing SARS-CoV-2.

Guided by previous findings from past investigations, Nakajima’s team used the polymerizable complex method combined with hydrothermal processing to produce CMO powder samples with an almost single-crystal phase. This process required many attempts and much patience.

Photo: Pixabay

The researchers say that the potential applications for CMO are vast. The powder could be applied as coatings for high-contact surfaces like cell phones, door handles, faucets, elevator buttons, walls, windows, and maybe even clothing. Nakajima says he and his team are proud and hopeful of the role that their development could play in the fight against COVID-19.

Sources: Materials Letters, Eureka Alert

About the Author
  • Kathryn is a curious world-traveller interested in the intersection between nature, culture, history, and people. She has worked for environmental education non-profits and is a Spanish/English interpreter.
You May Also Like
JUL 13, 2021
Microbiology
Expanding Viral Populations May be More Adaptable Than We Knew
JUL 13, 2021
Expanding Viral Populations May be More Adaptable Than We Knew
In nature, growing populations from bacterial colonies to humans tend to expand. In pulled expansions, the individuals a ...
AUG 10, 2021
Neuroscience
Is consciousness a quantum phenomenon?
AUG 10, 2021
Is consciousness a quantum phenomenon?
Researchers experiments with quantum fractals reveal promising direction for consciousness research
AUG 18, 2021
Space & Astronomy
The Size of Black Holes Depends on their Feeding Patterns
AUG 18, 2021
The Size of Black Holes Depends on their Feeding Patterns
The feeding patterns of black holes are directly correlated to their size. The corresponding study was published in  ...
AUG 30, 2021
Space & Astronomy
Is it Safe to Travel to Mars?
AUG 30, 2021
Is it Safe to Travel to Mars?
It should be safe for humans to travel to Mars, provided journeys don’t take more than four years. The correspondi ...
SEP 02, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
The Future of Room-Temperature Superconductors
SEP 02, 2021
The Future of Room-Temperature Superconductors
It begins with two diamonds, a pinch of carbon, sulfur, and a whiff of hydrogen gas. The result is the world’s fir ...
SEP 16, 2021
Chemistry & Physics
American Astronomical Society Commits to Open Access Journals
SEP 16, 2021
American Astronomical Society Commits to Open Access Journals
The American Astronomical Society (AAS) will move to open access format by January 1, 2022. AAS publishes six journals: ...
Loading Comments...