FEB 15, 2018 12:30 PM PST

Astrophysical X-rays Source Inspires New Theory Of Dark Matter

X-ray image of the Perseus galaxy cluster, approximately 240 million light-years away from Earth. Credit: NASA

In a recent paper, astrophysicists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have come up with a new hypothesis to explain what dark matter is made of,  based on the observations of unidentified x-ray signals of a particular energy spectrum.

Unlike ordinary matter, dark matters do not comply with the Standard Model of physics or emit visible light. Compared to normal matter, which consitutes 5% of the universe, dark matter represents 23% of total mass-energy, despite the fact that it has not been directly observed by any means.

First postulated in the 1930s, the concept of dark matter was employed by Swiss astrophysicist Fritz Zwicky to explain his puzzling observation of Coma Galaxy Cluster: the gravitational force within the cluster shouldn’t be strong enough to keep the galaxies together, based on the mass of visible matters. He was convinced that there must be invisible matters in the seemingly void space, which holds the cluster in the observed structure.

Many physicists have been trying figure out the nature of dark matter, and one idea has gained the most acceptance: dark matter is mostly made of weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs. A WIMP has no clear definition and its estimated mass have a wide range between 6 and 30 GeV (giga-electron volt) . It exists in concept as a new elementary particle which interacts via gravity and likely exists outside the standard model.

The idea of WIMPs helped to resolve many astrophysical and cosmological problems related to dark matter. However, recent null results from direct detection and the lack evidence of supersymmetry had some lose faith in the hypothesis. And some physicists have even turned to alternative theories that eliminate the idea of dark matters all together.

Researchers at JGU have now presented a new theory: dark matter is made of extremely light particles. How light? Almost one hundred times lighter than electrons (an electron has a mass of 0.51 MeV or mega-electron volt), a million times smaller in mass than the WIMPs theory proposed.

So what is the base of this new hypothesis? In 2014, several groups reported hints for an unidentified line in astrophysical x-ray signals from galaxies and galaxy clusters with the energy at 3.5 keV. While some dismissed it as a reflection of imperfectly modeled atomic transitions, others thought that the unusual X-ray signal could well be the decay radiation emitted by dark matters.

Chandra X-ray Observatory. Credit: Wikipedia

With a wavelength ranging from one picometer to a few nanometers, X-rays expand the astronomers’ horizons by tapping into the spectrum that is inaccessible by an optical telescope. Because X-radiation is absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, so X-rays observatories are placed into high altitude by balloons, sounding rockets, and satellites.

Particle physicist Joachim Kopp at the Mainz-based Cluster of Excellence on Precision Physics, Fundamental Interactions and Structure of Matter (PRISMA) proposed an idea that takes a step further. He postulated that the dark matter particles are essentially fermions and a mass of only a few kilo-electron volts and the 3.5 keV X-ray signal comes from the annihilation of two dark matter particles. The model is analogous to the same phenomenon of an electron's collision with its antiparticle a positron, after which both particles vanished giving birth to a pair of high energy photons.  

"It has long been assumed that it would not be possible to observe such annihilation of dark matter if it were made of particles that light," explained Kopp. "We have subjected our new model to scrutiny and have compared it with experimental data, and it all fits together much better than in the case of older models." What’s more intriguing, calculations done by Kopp’s team matched the hypothetical x-ray signature with the actual X-ray observations.

Even though the idea of lightweight dark matter makes it hard to explain the formation of galaxies, Kopp was confident about their model. "So far, we have been able to deal with these concerns," said Kopp. "Our model provides an elegant way out."

Researchers detect possible signal from dark matter. Credit: EPFL

Source: Universitaet-Mainz

About the Author
  • Graduated with a bachelor degree in Pharmaceutical Science and a master degree in neuropharmacology, Daniel is a radiopharmaceutical and radiobiology expert based in Ottawa, Canada. With years of experience in biomedical R&D, Daniel is very into writing. He is constantly fascinated by what's happening in the world of science. He hopes to capture the public's interest and promote scientific literacy with his trending news articles. The recurring topics in his Chemistry & Physics trending news section include alternative energy, material science, theoretical physics, medical imaging, and green chemistry.
You May Also Like
OCT 09, 2019
Chemistry & Physics
OCT 09, 2019
2019 Nobel Prize in Physics: Exoplanets and the Evolution of Our Universe
This Tuesday, October 8th, the Nobel Prize committee announced the winners of this year's Physics Nobel. Canadian cosmologist James Peebles, alongside...
NOV 19, 2019
Space & Astronomy
NOV 19, 2019
Can We Terraform Mars?
Space agencies and commercial space companies are taking the idea of colonizing Mars very seriously. There’s just one problem: the red planet isn&rsq...
JAN 09, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
JAN 09, 2020
Accelerator on a Chip: Honey, I Shrunk the Particle Accelerator
When we talk about about particle accelerators, the idea of enormous machines with the size of a warehouse and located inside underground tunnels...
JAN 21, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 21, 2020
2020 Space Research: What to Expect
2019 was one of the most exciting years for space fans. Therefore it’s hard to believe that 2020 could bring something even more fascinating. Ho...
JAN 22, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 22, 2020
Astronomers Have Found the Farthest Galaxy Group
An international team of astronomers funded in part by NASA has found the farthest galaxy group identified to date.  The trio of galaxies, called EGS7...
FEB 06, 2020
Health & Medicine
FEB 06, 2020
Scientists Found a Safe BPA Alternative
BPA—bisphenol A—is an industrial chemical used in a wide range of everyday consumer products. From food and beverage can linings and storage co...
Loading Comments...