APR 03, 2018 12:49 PM PDT

CO2 Reduction, by Freezing Antarctic Air

WRITTEN BY: Daniel Duan

Sometimes considered as the "Plan B" for solving the climate change problem, carbon sequestration is the process of capturing and storing atmospheric carbon dioxide through biological, chemical or physical methods.

Australian climate scientist Tim Flannery raised an innovative if not outlandish idea for pulling carbon dioxide out of the air—freezing and storing CO2 in Antarctica.

CO2 turns from a gas to a solid between -75 and -90 C (-103 and -130 F). So it is already naturally falling like snow in Antarctica when the temperature is right. But as the temperature rises, the solid CO2 goes back into the air.

Flannery argued that adding artificial refrigeration to the process can freeze both water and CO2 together into solid particles, which make them easy to store. Since Antarctica stays cold enough all year round, the extraction process would use the least amount of energy. A group of scientists backed this idea with a proposal: building a 500 football-field-sized storage pit in Antarctica. Wind-powered refrigeration devices on site operate 24-7 to freeze moisture with CO2 and store the frozen particles into the pit.

Source: SciShow via Youtube

About the Author
  • Graduated with a bachelor degree in Pharmaceutical Science and a master degree in neuropharmacology, Daniel is a radiopharmaceutical and radiobiology expert based in Ottawa, Canada. With years of experience in biomedical R&D, Daniel is very into writing. He is constantly fascinated by what's happening in the world of science. He hopes to capture the public's interest and promote scientific literacy with his trending news articles. The recurring topics in his Chemistry & Physics trending news section include alternative energy, material science, theoretical physics, medical imaging, and green chemistry.
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