JUN 29, 2019 11:19 PM PDT

New "Law" Describes The Rate At Which Quantum Computers Are Improving

WRITTEN BY: Abbie Arce

The CEO of Intel, Gordon Moore, and his 1965 paper on the topic describes the rate at which computers are improving and estimate this growth to continue for at least another decade. Moore’s prediction has proven accurate for decades and has been used in semiconductor research and development to set various targets. Many digital electronics are linked to Moore’s Law through their memory capacities, pixel counts, and sensor quality. These computers have possible applications throughout all fields, including medical science. In the face of quantum computing, Moore’s Law seems to be approaching the beginning of the end.

In the race towards improved computational ability, quantum computing emerged as a way to perform calculations which classical computers are not yet capable. They are also able to notice trends in data which traditional statistics would miss. This contains the possibility to personalize medicine, including significantly improve diagnostics. While classical computers depend on the binary -zero or one- system, quantum computers are capable of superposition. Superposition is a principle of quantum mechanics that states any two quantum states can be added together or superposed. 

Rapid improvement in quantum computing has led to a new law for describing their progression, Neven’s Law. The director of the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab first mentioned this new law in May at the Google Quantum Spring Symposium. At the symposium, Navin said that quantum computers are gaining on classical computers at a “doubly exponential“ rate.

This incredibly fast improvement in the abilities of quantum computers is allowing scientists to expand the amount of knowledge we can possibly verify. The rate at which these improvements are occurring is so fast it’s difficult to describe. It’s so speedy a progression that quantum computing may be the first real-world example of doubly exponential growth.

While traditional computers have yet to become stagnant in their evolution, it requires the constant development of algorithms to keep classical computers at pace with Moore’s Law.

With the goal of quantum computing being the ability to perform calculations that cannot currently be stimulated in any reasonable amount of time, the milestone of quantum supremacy still remains elusive. That said, scientists say, based on Neven’s Law that quantum supremacy cannot be far off. 

Sources: Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer ScienceSeeker

About the Author
  • Abbie is an AFAA certified personal trainer and fitness instructor with an interest in all things health-science. She has recently graduated with her BS in Applied Sport and Exercise Science from Barry University in Miami. Next, she intends to earn an MPH with a focus in Epidemiology.
You May Also Like
SEP 08, 2019
Health & Medicine
SEP 08, 2019
Acute Flaccid Myelitis and Its Association With Enterovirus D68
Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a polio-like infection, caught the attention of physicians in the U.S. during late summer and early fall in 2014. The outbrea...
SEP 27, 2019
Immunology
SEP 27, 2019
Diseases We Share with Our Canine Companions: Autoimmune Encephalitis in Dogs
Like humans, dogs can develop autoimmune encephalitis, and it’s common - mostly affecting smaller breeds and young adult dogs. Now scientists underst...
OCT 09, 2019
Neuroscience
OCT 09, 2019
Elderly Depression Remains Consistant As Antidepressant Use Doubles
  A new study from the University of East Anglia finds that despite a 2-fold increase in antidepressant use, depression among individuals 65 and older...
OCT 10, 2019
Cardiology
OCT 10, 2019
Parkinson's Disease is Present in the Blood
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. Often starting with a barely noticeable tremor in one hand, the disease affects a...
FEB 19, 2020
Immunology
FEB 19, 2020
Testing the Immune Response to Ovarian Cancer Treatment
There is a new diagnostic test for the deadliest form of gynecological cancer – ovarian cancer. Better tests mean better diagnostics, and better diag...
FEB 21, 2020
Clinical & Molecular DX
FEB 21, 2020
Diagnosing COVID-19
Diagnosing coronavirus is done through next-generation sequencing, real-time RT-PCR tests, cell culture, and electron miscopy. For patients, that translate...
Loading Comments...