APR 29, 2015 7:25 AM PDT

Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble

Tourists going to the summit of the Kilauea Volcano may catch a glimpse of a boiling hot lava lake. A molten pool atop the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii is approaching overflow levels for the first time since it was discovered in February 2010.
A lava lake atop Kilauea is rising
Normally the lava level cannot be seen by tourists as it sits about 100 feet below the rim of of Overlook Crater, which in turn is deep inside the larger crater Halemau'mau crater at the summit of Klauea. Overlook crater was created during an eruption in March of 2008

On April 22, the lava started to rise and is now within ten feet of the craters rim. According to the US Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the lava briefly came in contact with the crater's edge on the morning of April 28, 2015.
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