JUN 05, 2015 09:42 AM PDT

Global Warming Hiatus Wasn't Real, According to New Study

You may have heard recently about something of a ‘hiatus' involving global warming in that the effects of global warming have actually slowed down over the last 15 years. No one could explain why the global warming process suddenly took a break, so new information was gathered to find out why.

New data from scientists of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) suggests that this slowing of global warming was actually just an error of data calculation and that global warming is still continuing to affect the planet as it has been doing over the last century.

Global warming is still a real thing, a new United States study reveals.

"The new analysis suggests no discernible decrease in the rate of warming between the second half of the 20th century, a period marked by manmade warming, and the first fifteen years of the 21st century, a period dubbed a global warming 'hiatus,'" says the report via the results of testing by the NOAA. "Instead, the rate of warming during the first fifteen years of the 21st century is at least as great as that in the last half of the 20th century, suggesting warming is continuing apace."

We recently reported on evidence that Antarctic ice shelves were melting away. The only thing that could actually be causing large hunks of ice in our oceans to melt is if the heat of the planet was being turned up and changing the environment that these giant hunks of ice typically exist in.

The NOAA reports that 2014 was the hottest year on Earth in recent history and that the world continues to set new high records. As you can imagine, this is no good for the icy regions of our Earth and exacerbates the melting process, leading to rising sea levels among other various bad side effects.

The new numbers are certainly an interesting proof of concept, but they haven't convinced every scientist in the world that global warming is rising at ‘alarming' rates.

Piers Forster, a climate change professor at the University of Leeds, thinks that even with all of the new information taken into account, global warming is still far less hyperbolized than the data makes it out to be. As a result, he believes that there is still a decreased trend no matter how you want to look at it.

"Even with the corrections in this study, the observed warming has not been as large as predicted by models. Other global datasets, even when corrected for missing Arctic data, still show a decreased trend since 1998," Piers explains. "I still don't think this study will be the last word on this complex subject.

At the end of the day, science has once again shown us that global warming is still a thing. The greenhouse gas effect is still impacting our planet's temperature.

Source: AFP via Yahoo News

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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