MAR 17, 2019 8:40 AM PDT

Students strike for the planet

Young environmental activists around the world walked out of their classes on Friday to protest inaction on the behalf of their governments regarding climate change. Thousands of students from over 100 countries participated in the walk-out in what was named the “Youth Climate Strike.”

Although the students hail from different nations and are pushing for distinct policy changes according to their countries’ positions, as a whole, the students are pushing for reductions in greenhouse gas emission. Following a report released last year from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the world has a mere eleven years left to take significant action if we desire to prevent extreme climate-related disasters.

Despite the fact that 195 countries signed the Paris climate accords over three years ago in a commitment to keeping global temperatures less than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the young environmentalists are under the impression that not enough tangible action has been taken by global leaders to keeping their promises. Indeed, if we continue to emit greenhouse gases at the rate that we are currently doing so, the planet will reach that 1.5 degrees Celsius marker as soon as 2030.

According to the Youth Climate Strike website, the students participating in the US walk-outs will be striking for the following demands:

1. A national embrace of the Green New Deal

2. An end to fossil fuel infrastructure projects

3. A national emergency declaration on climate change

4. Mandatory education on climate change and its effects from K-8

5. A clean water supply

6. Preservation of public lands and wildlife

7. All government decisions to be tied to scientific research

While strikes took place in almost all fifty US states, the gathering outside the capitol in DC was particularly impressive. Twelve-year-old Haven Coleman, co-founder and co-director of the US Youth Climate Strike, stated at a news conference in DC, "Today, the tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands, maybe millions of kids who are striking around the world are doing it not because we want to skip school, but because we are scared. Climate change is the largest threat to our lives, our future and our world.”

Students strike around the world to fight climate change. Photo: DW

Sources: CNN, BBC News

About the Author
  • Kathryn is a curious world-traveller interested in the intersection between nature, culture, history, and people. She has worked for environmental education non-profits and is a Spanish/English interpreter.
You May Also Like
DEC 01, 2019
Earth & The Environment
DEC 01, 2019
Reducing GHG emissions of the transportation sector
The United States Environmental Protection Agency reported that the highest greenhouse gas emissions in 2017 were in the transportation sector, making up a...
DEC 02, 2019
Earth & The Environment
DEC 02, 2019
Let's use grape skins to deice our roads
Large parts of the country are getting hit with the first big snowstorm of the year this week and if you travel the roads, you ought to be concerned &ndash...
DEC 23, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 23, 2019
The Captivating Mating Process of a Jumping Spider
When you’re a male jumping spider and you fancy finding a female to mate with, you might try your hand – or in this case paddle – at impr...
JAN 07, 2020
Plants & Animals
JAN 07, 2020
Baby Penguins Are Often Bullied to Death by Adults
Most people envision penguins as fun, happy-go-lucky birds residing in the Earth’s chilly polar regions, but that’s not always the case. In fac...
JAN 28, 2020
Plants & Animals
JAN 28, 2020
A Slug Does All it Can to Defend Against Hungry Ants
Slugs are slow, and this makes them easy targets for predators however big or small they might be. Here, we see that a slug has been spotted by a hungry co...
FEB 13, 2020
Earth & The Environment
FEB 13, 2020
Dams in the Mekong lower river temperatures
A study discussing the environmental impacts of hydropower dams on rivers in the Mekong River basin was published recently in Environmental Research Letter...
Loading Comments...