MAY 23, 2019 6:08 PM PDT

Missouri's tornado disaster

The powerful tornado that swept across Jefferson City, Missouri last night has left havoc in its wake, with at least three people dead. According to the National Weather Service, the tornado raged winds up to 160 mph and was rated an EF-3 on the Enhanced Fujita scale.

The tornado touched down at approximately 11:45 PM CDT and the National Weather Service in St. Louis issued a tornado emergency soon after for the region. In Jefferson City, the tornado's funnel was wider than its height; it also shot debris 13,000 feet up into the air, reported the National Weather Service said.

First responders worked through until the morning to rescue those trapped in downed structures and at least twenty people were transported to hospitals. Those three dead were from Golden City, which is located in southwestern Missouri.

"Across the state, Missouri’s first responders once again responded quickly and with strong coordination as much of the state dealt with extremely dangerous conditions that left people injured, trapped in homes, and tragically led to the death of three people," said Missouri Governor Mike Parson, after confirming the damage to state buildings. He also confirmed that certain parts of the region were without power. According to Accuweather, Parson declared a state of emergency earlier in the week because of severe weather and the ongoing flood threat.

Severe weather devastates the region. Photo: Pixabay

From early Wednesday into Thursday morning, the National Weather Service reported at least 29 tornadoes, mostly in Missouri and Oklahoma. Since last Friday, that total rises to 171 tornadoes. The region was also bombarded by strong thunderstorms following the tornado, which affected from Ottawa County, Oklahoma, to Bexter Springs and Galena, Kansas, and Carl Junction, Oronogo and Golden City, Missouri.

Meteorologists warn that the threat is not over yet, as tornadoes could endanger Lubbock, Texas, to the Kansas City area and from Columbus, Ohio, to Philadelphia.

Sources: CNN, Accuweather

About the Author
BA Environmental Studies
Kathryn is a curious world-traveller interested in the intersection between nature, culture, history, and people. She has worked for environmental education non-profits and is a Spanish/English interpreter.
You May Also Like
OCT 19, 2022
Plants & Animals
Unparalleled Levels of Insects Harming Modern Day Plants
OCT 19, 2022
Unparalleled Levels of Insects Harming Modern Day Plants
In a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of researchers led by the Uni ...
OCT 23, 2022
Plants & Animals
Animals Adapt Sleep Cycle to Stay Alert When Danger Lurks
OCT 23, 2022
Animals Adapt Sleep Cycle to Stay Alert When Danger Lurks
A recent study highlights that animals calibrate their sleep cycle in response to their environment. Researchers from Wa ...
OCT 27, 2022
Cannabis Sciences
Hemp: The Next Big Bioplastic
OCT 27, 2022
Hemp: The Next Big Bioplastic
New research reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces examined the potential to use hemp as a bioplastic. Hemp ...
NOV 04, 2022
Earth & The Environment
Grad Student Highlights: Ian McDowell (University of Nevada, Reno)
NOV 04, 2022
Grad Student Highlights: Ian McDowell (University of Nevada, Reno)
This interview series is focused on the graduate student experience across all STEM fields that allows them to get their ...
NOV 07, 2022
Health & Medicine
The aye-aye might be weirder than we originally thought
NOV 07, 2022
The aye-aye might be weirder than we originally thought
New research finds that the aye-aye is one of 12 primates who picks their nose.
NOV 17, 2022
Plants & Animals
Honeybees Are Living 50% Shorter Lives Than 50 Years Ago
NOV 17, 2022
Honeybees Are Living 50% Shorter Lives Than 50 Years Ago
New research shows that honeybees are living half the lifespans they used to only 50 years ago. Researchers from the Uni ...
Loading Comments...