FEB 02, 2016 01:24 PM PST

New DNA "Aptamer" Modifications for Disease Detection and Drug Delivery

WRITTEN BY: Kara Marker
Single-stranded molecules of DNA called “aptamers” have been studied since 1990 for their ability to bind and inhibit molecular targets, a useful behavior for disease detection and drug delivery (Nature). However, aptamers have not been approved for clinical use yet because of variable binding ability and quick digestion by enzymes. With two modifications, though, a team of researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) at the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), could soon be on the way to developing the first approved aptamer technology.
 
Just like the antibodies produced by the immune system that target foreign pathogens, aptamers have the potential to become a specialized army for infectious diseases. However, just like medicine, aptamers need time in the bloodstream to find and bind to their target. If they are quickly and easily digested by enzymes waiting in the blood stream, the aptamers will not have time to act, making their effectiveness irrelevant.
 

IBN Principal Research Scientist and Team Leader Dr. Ichiro Hirao and a team of researchers from A*STAR equipped their aptamers with a sequence of DNA called a “mini hairpin DNA” to prevent enzyme digestion, allowing the aptamers time to find and inhibit their targets. With the mini hairpin DNA, aptamers can survive for days rather than hours, as the DNA sequence acts as a “protective shield.”
 
Hirao’s team also overcame the problem of aptamer binding capabilities by adding an “unnatural base” that improved binding by 100 percent. Unnatural bases were developed to supplement the natural bases – A, T, G, and C (Nature). In this case, the extra component of the single-strand of DNA greatly enhanced its binding capabilities.
 
We hope to use our DNA aptamers as the platform technology for diagnostics and new drug development," said IBN Executive Director Professor Jackie Y. Ying. Scientists from the IBN plan to soon begin testing the aptamers for specific diseases. Their current study is published in the journal Scientific Reports.
 

Source: A*STAR
 
About the Author
  • I am a scientific journalist and enthusiast, especially in the realm of biomedicine. I am passionate about conveying the truth in scientific phenomena and subsequently improving health and public awareness. Sometimes scientific research needs a translator to effectively communicate the scientific jargon present in significant findings. I plan to be that translating communicator, and I hope to decrease the spread of misrepresented scientific phenomena! Check out my science blog: ScienceKara.com.
You May Also Like
AUG 28, 2018
Genetics & Genomics
AUG 28, 2018
A New Type of Cell is Discovered in the Human Brain
This cell type has never been observed in laboratory animals....
SEP 06, 2018
Genetics & Genomics
SEP 06, 2018
The Human Genome may Contain 20% Fewer Genes Than Thought
The human genome was once estimated to contain 50,000 to 90,000 genes; that number has been revised steadily downward....
SEP 27, 2018
Genetics & Genomics
SEP 27, 2018
Learning What Causes Algae Blooms to Turn Toxic
According to the EPA, algal blooms threaten every state and in our changing climate, they may be more common....
OCT 02, 2018
Health & Medicine
OCT 02, 2018
Many Patients Are Unaware of Increased Cancer Risk
Just as recently as a few decades ago, many common health screenings were not readily available. Mammography, for breast cancer detection, wasn't ...
OCT 22, 2018
Videos
OCT 22, 2018
Are GMOs Safe?
While consumers may have valid ethical concerns about GMOs, 30 years of research says they are safe to eat....
OCT 25, 2018
Health & Medicine
OCT 25, 2018
Sedentary Lifestyle More Deadly Than Smoking
A number of recent studies have found that first cardiovascular associations with regular high-intensity exercise. These studies......
Loading Comments...