AUG 31, 2019 6:09 PM PDT

AI Not Ready To Predict Acute Kidney Injury

WRITTEN BY: Amanda Mikyska

Image source: Siemens Healthineers

 

An international group of scientists from the U.S. and U.K. published new research in Nature about the effectiveness of AI in predicting Acute Kidney Injury (AKI).  

AKI is a blockage of waste that is a deadly complication for hospital patients.  Using AI, the researchers aimed to able to detect early signs of the condition before traditional methods.  Giving hospitals a way to detect symptoms earlier could save lives and prevent permanent damage.  

The group gathered data from 703,782 patients, all between the ages of 18 and 90, who had suffered some form of AKI.  First, the data was fed to algorithm, which learned the earliest signs of an impeding AKI.  Then the researchers reran the algorithm as a prediction method to see how early and accurately it could predict the kidney condition.  

Results show that the technology still needs some work, with prediction accuracy only reaching 90% in the most severe cases.  In less severe the prediction accuracy slipped to 55.8%, and the algorithm resulted in two falsely predictions for every correctly predicted occurrence.  

The technology has the potential to save hospitals time, and therefore save lives.  AI was able to predict severe cases 48 hours in advance of traditional tests, giving hospital staff critical time to prevent or minimize injury.  

AKI usually occurs in hospitals, following other major health procedures.  Injury is caused by a blockage of waste which leaves the kidneys unable to balance fluid in the body, and ultimately damages other organs.  AKI progresses within hours or days, and emergency action must be taken to avoid permanent damage or death.

 

Sources: Nature, National Kidney Foundation, MedicalExpress

About the Author
  • Amanda graduated from the University of Massachusetts Boston with a degree in Biology. After working in research on creating biochemicals from genetically engineered yeast, she started freelance science writing while traveling the world. Now, Amanda is a Lab Manager and Research Assistant at the the University of Central Florida, studying the molecular phylogeny of parasitic wasps. She writes about the latest research in Neuroscience, Genetics & Genomics, and Immunology. Interested in working on solutions for food/water security, sustainable fuel, and sustainable farming. Amanda is an avid skier, podcast listener, and has run two triathlons.
You May Also Like
OCT 19, 2021
Immunology
Reverse Vaccinations Tame the Immune System to Help Hemophilia Patients
OCT 19, 2021
Reverse Vaccinations Tame the Immune System to Help Hemophilia Patients
In patients with hemophilia A—a hereditary disorder where the blood cannot clot properly—their immune system ...
NOV 17, 2021
Health & Medicine
Nutrients for Reducing Autoimmune Disease Risk
NOV 17, 2021
Nutrients for Reducing Autoimmune Disease Risk
Want to reduce your chances of having your immune system turn on your body and start destroying your perfect health? Loo ...
NOV 25, 2021
Immunology
What's a T Cell COVID Vaccine and Could It Be Better Than What We Have?
NOV 25, 2021
What's a T Cell COVID Vaccine and Could It Be Better Than What We Have?
All vaccines train the immune system to recognize and wage war against pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. However, ...
DEC 07, 2021
Immunology
Ancient Medicine and Synthetic Biology Collide to Combat Chemo Resistance
DEC 07, 2021
Ancient Medicine and Synthetic Biology Collide to Combat Chemo Resistance
  Strong chemical drugs used to obliterate all rapidly growing cells in the body have been used to treat cancer sin ...
JAN 13, 2022
Immunology
Gene Unveiled as Missing Link in Antibody Development
JAN 13, 2022
Gene Unveiled as Missing Link in Antibody Development
  Antibodies are a core part of the immune system's pathogen-fighting arsenal, defending the body against bacte ...
JAN 18, 2022
Drug Discovery & Development
Identifying Oncostatin M (OSM): One Protein's Role in Severe Asthma
JAN 18, 2022
Identifying Oncostatin M (OSM): One Protein's Role in Severe Asthma
Asthma is a chronic condition that is characterized by difficulty breathing, coughing, and wheezing which is caused, in ...
Loading Comments...