JUN 23, 2017 08:23 PM PDT

Delivering A New HIV Vaccine

WRITTEN BY: Kara Marker

Creating a successful vaccine for HIV has so far been unsuccessful, but now scientists are zeroing in on two important factors for perfecting the vaccine: timing and mode of delivery.

The vaccine candidates used in the study mimic the trimeric envelope protein spikes on the surface of HIV. Rendering of HIV with envelope protein trimers clearly visible on the virus surface. Credit: La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology

The potential HIV vaccine is based on neutralizing antibodies, which attach to viruses and prevent them from promoting infection. However, in the past neutralizing antibodies have been “notoriously difficult” to create in the context of targeting HIV. From the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, researchers tested the efficacy of an optimized vaccine in non-human primates, a traditional model for studying HIV. However, the initial vaccine wasn’t successful at first.

"The animals' immune responses, although the right kind, weren't very robust and a few didn't respond at all," explained Colin Havenar-Daughton, PhD. "That caused significant concern that the immunogen wouldn't consistently trigger an effective immune response in all individuals in a human clinical trial."

They improved upon the vaccine, using subcutaneous delivery - under the skin like insulin and morphine injections. Additionally, they increased the time intervals between immunizations, ensuring a slow and steady delivery. This makes the vaccine’s effect stronger, activating the neutralizing antibodies.

"Depending on how we gave the vaccine, there was a bigger difference due to immunization route than we would have predicted," explained co-lead author Matthias Pauthner. "We can help translate what we know now into the clinic."

HIV in 2017

HIV is now relatively considered to be a “chronic, manageable disease” thanks to antiretroviral drugs that treat AIDS. Although, accessibility to these drugs isn’t guaranteed; only half of people living with HIV have access to treatment, and new people are contracting the disease every day. The new

"The vaccine candidates we worked with here are probably the most promising prototypes out there, and one will go into people in 2018," said Professor Dennis R. Burton, PhD.

The present study was published in the journal Immunity.

 

Source: La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Healthline

About the Author
  • I am a scientific journalist and enthusiast, especially in the realm of biomedicine. I am passionate about conveying the truth in scientific phenomena and subsequently improving health and public awareness. Sometimes scientific research needs a translator to effectively communicate the scientific jargon present in significant findings. I plan to be that translating communicator, and I hope to decrease the spread of misrepresented scientific phenomena! Check out my science blog: ScienceKara.com.
You May Also Like
JUL 17, 2018
Immunology
JUL 17, 2018
Powering up the Elderly's Immune System
Use of drugs that inhibit the TORC1 pathway has bolstered the immune systems of the elderly, leading to a decrease in potentially deadly infections such as pneumonia and influenza....
JUL 18, 2018
Immunology
JUL 18, 2018
Immunotherapy Increases Survival of Melanoma Brain Metastases Patients
Use of Checkpoint Blockade Immunotherapy increases survival rates in Melanoma Brain Metastases patients, with a 4-year survival rate increase from 11.1% to 28.1%...
JUL 25, 2018
Immunology
JUL 25, 2018
T Cell Response to Ebola Virus Proteins
Killer T cells of Ebola survivors respond better to nucleoproteins, not glycoproteins, potentially influencing Ebola vaccine development....
AUG 29, 2018
Immunology
AUG 29, 2018
Immune System Prioritizes Response when Faced with Multiple Threats
The Innate Immune response prioritizes lung infection and cell repair over other threats in both infants and adults....
OCT 04, 2018
Videos
OCT 04, 2018
Why Do We Have Nightmares With a Fever?
Fever is the body’s response to a threat. When some viruses or bacteria try to enter the body, an immune response begins that can include a sharp ris...
OCT 08, 2018
Immunology
OCT 08, 2018
Nuclear Imaging: The Next Generation of Biopsy
A team of researchers has published their work in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine describing techniques with PET imaging as an alternative to biopsy methods....
Loading Comments...