AUG 15, 2015 3:34 PM PDT

IQ by Age 2

WRITTEN BY: Ilene Schneider
While the IQ of adults born very prematurely or of very low birth weight can be predicted when they are just toddlers, the same research found that the IQ of adults who were born full-term could not be accurately predicted until age six. Prior research has shown that very premature birth and very low birth weight have resulted in impaired cognitive function from childhood and throughout adulthood, but it had not been clear how soon adult IQ could be predicted in these children, according to an article in the journal Pediatrics that was reported in Futurity.
By age 2, the adult IQ of preemies and low-birth-weight babies can be predicted. 
As Dieter Wolke, a psychology professor at the University of Warwick, explained, “We believe this is the first time a research paper has looked into the prediction of the IQ of adults over the age of 26 who were born very premature or with very low birth weight. The results indicate that assessing two-year-olds who were born very preterm or very underweight will provide a reasonably good prediction to what their adult IQ will be.”
 
According to HowStuffWorks, IQ tests are designed to measure one’s general ability to solve problems and understand concepts. This includes reasoning ability, problem-solving ability, ability to perceive relationships between things and ability to store and retrieve information. IQ tests measure this general intellectual ability in a number of different ways.

In terms of all of the assessments in the study, very premature and very low birth weight children and adults had lower IQ scores than those born full-term, even when researchers excluded individuals with severe cognitive impairment from the comparisons. The researchers conducted the study, called the Bavarian Longitudinal Study, in southern Bavaria, Germany. They followed children who were born between 1985 and 1986 from birth into adulthood. Data gained on cognitive function were assessed with developmental and intelligence tests (IQ) at five and 20 months and at four, six, eight, and 26 years of age.
 
Of the babies two-hundred-and-sixty born either very premature (before 32 weeks) or with very low birth weight (fewer than 1.5 kg) were compared with 229 who were born full-term. Their results were not sex-specific or related to income or education. They were compared to the control group of adults who were born healthy in the same obstetric wards.
 
According to Wolke, “Some children born very premature or with very low birth weight scored low on cognitive tests but beat the odds and improved into adulthood. However, many with persistent problems can be detected in the second year of life. Early identification of cognitive problems in these children may help to plan specialized therapeutic and educational interventions to help them and their families.”
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
SEP 16, 2020
Neuroscience
Men and Women Have Different Circadian Rhythms
SEP 16, 2020
Men and Women Have Different Circadian Rhythms
From a meta-analysis, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have found that men and women tend to have differe ...
OCT 01, 2020
Immunology
Immune Cells and MS: The Good, the Bad, and the Maybe
OCT 01, 2020
Immune Cells and MS: The Good, the Bad, and the Maybe
Much like electrical wires that are encased in plastic insulating sheaths, nerve cells also are also surrounded by a sim ...
OCT 05, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
A Rare Form of Dementia is Discovered
OCT 05, 2020
A Rare Form of Dementia is Discovered
There are different types of dementia, a term for a loss of cognitive function, including Alzheimer's disease and Le ...
OCT 13, 2020
Neuroscience
Sleep Apnea and Alzheimer's Damage Brain in Same Way
OCT 13, 2020
Sleep Apnea and Alzheimer's Damage Brain in Same Way
Sleep apnea is characterized by breathing that repeatedly stops and starts, loud snoring, restless sleep, and sleepiness ...
NOV 15, 2020
Neuroscience
Researchers Confirm Link Between Alzheimer's and Gut Bacteria
NOV 15, 2020
Researchers Confirm Link Between Alzheimer's and Gut Bacteria
Researchers from the University of Geneva in Switzerland have confirmed the link between an imbalance of gut bacteria an ...
NOV 24, 2020
Neuroscience
Could Memory Manipulation Treat Alcohol Addiction?
NOV 24, 2020
Could Memory Manipulation Treat Alcohol Addiction?
Researchers from Boston University have found that manipulating how fear-based memories are processed may modify addicti ...
Loading Comments...