AUG 22, 2015 7:53 PM PDT

Overwork and Stroke

WRITTEN BY: Ilene Schneider
People who work longer hours increase their risk of having a stroke, according to a new European study published recently in The Lancet and reported by Seth Augenstein in Bioscience Technology. The report citied physical inactivity, heavy drinking and a tendency to ignore symptoms of health problems as part of the reason that people who spend extra hours at the office had a 33 percent higher risk for cerebrovascular events.
More work equals more likelihood of stroke. 
As the authors concluded, “Our findings show that individuals who work 55 hours or more per week have a 1.3 times higher risk of incident stroke than those working standard hours. Long working hours were also associated with incident coronary heart disease, but this association was weaker than that for stroke.”
 
The authors explained that the meta-analysis of 25 previous studies tracked 603,838 people. The study adjusted for self-reported factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index and other factors.
 
The people who were working longer hours had higher rates of strokes when the researchers crunched the numbers, they said. Additionally, the researchers discovered that people who were from lower socioeconomic groupings also were likely to have more strokes and to develop coronary heart disease. They added that the risk of the latter was only increased by 13 percent.
 
There were 44 scientists who were listed as authors on the paper. Together, they hypothesized that physical inactivity, a tendency toward heavier alcohol consumption and even just a proclivity to ignore healthy symptoms while sitting at the desk could be a partially explain the linkage. However, they found that the very pressure of being at work could be the main underlying cause. As they concluded, “Sudden death from overwork is often caused by stroke and is believed to result from a repetitive triggering of the stress response.”
 
According to Mika Kivimaki, the lead author, from University College London, “The pooling of all available studies on this topic allowed us to investigate the association between working hours and cardiovascular disease risk with greater precision than has previously been possible.” The study is the “strongest indication of a causal association” yet for cardiovascular consequences of working too much, according to an accompanying Lancet analysis published by Urban Janlert, an epidemiologist from Umea University in Sweden.
 
Janlert wrote, “Long working hours are not a negligible occurrence. Therefore, that the length of a working day is an important determinant mainly for stroke, but perhaps also for coronary heart disease, is an important finding. For now, we have a risk factor that could and should be the subject of general policy decisions.”
 
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
DEC 23, 2019
Drug Discovery & Development
DEC 23, 2019
FDA Approves New Schizophrenic Drug
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved an atypical antipsychotic Caplyta (lumateperone; Intra-Cellular Therapies) for the treating schizoph...
JAN 05, 2020
Neuroscience
JAN 05, 2020
Memory Recall Linked to Circadian Rhythm
  A study from the University of Tokyo identified a specific gene responsible for memory retrieval in mice. The study aimed to investigate the biology...
JAN 21, 2020
Clinical & Molecular DX
JAN 21, 2020
Brain scans of teens predict their risk of binge drinking
We’ve seen teenage binge drinking widely represented in popular culture. There is, however, a dark side to what many consider harmless fun. Mounting...
FEB 07, 2020
Neuroscience
FEB 07, 2020
People with Autism have Fewer Fatty Sheaths Between Neurons
Myelin, a fatty substance, accelerates the delivery of electrical signals between neurons in the brain. Now, researchers have found that people with autism...
FEB 11, 2020
Neuroscience
FEB 11, 2020
The Gut: Your Second Brain
It turns out, "going with your gut" may be a more scientifically concrete phrase than we thought. The gut actually houses its own nervous system,...
FEB 17, 2020
Neuroscience
FEB 17, 2020
Being Bilingual Accelerates Alzheimer's Disease in the Brain
Although knowing two languages may be able to delay the onset of Alzheimer’s, researchers from Canada’s York University have found that it may ...
Loading Comments...