MAR 05, 2015 10:59 PM PST

Common Sleep Debt Biomarkers Are Found in Humans snd Rats

Saying that sleep is an essential biological process is as obvious as saying that the sun rises every morning. Still, researchers' understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep loss is still in its earliest stages. The risk for a host of metabolic disorders, including weight gain, diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease that can be associated with reduced sleep is driving basic investigations on the topic.

A group of researchers found common molecules signifying perturbed metabolism in response to sleep restriction in a comprehensive metabolic profiling of blood from both rats and humans. The team published a study in the Proceddings of the National Academy of Sciences. The team included Amita Sehgal, PhD, professor of Neuroscience at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, along with co-first authors Aalim M. Weljie, PhD, a research assistant professor of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics, and Peter Meerlo, PhD, from the University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Their findings point to an overall shift in how lipids are metabolized and evidence of systemic oxidative stress due to decreased sleep in both species.

Oxidative stress and lipid metabolism are important factors in metabolic diseases, although further work needs to be done to establish a mechanistic link between the markers found and specific diseases, stress the researchers.

As Sehgal explained, "One possibility is that sleep drives metabolite clearance and so acts as a reparative process at the metabolic level. The impact of sleep restriction on circadian biology is particularly relevant given what we now know about how metabolites also oscillate in humans on a daily basis. Metabolites are chemical intermediates or end products of metabolism, so while they are generated through the breakdown of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins, their function is not restricted to these processes.

They also have roles in signaling, regulating enzymatic activity, growth, and development.

Rats and humans were subjected to chronic sleep restriction over five days. As opposed to sleep deprivation, sleep restriction curtails sleep time, but does not eliminate sleep. "Sleep restriction more closely represents real-world situations in humans and is a condition experienced by millions of people every day," noted Sehgal.

Both studies compared metabolite levels in blood that was collected following adequate sleep opportunity in rats and humans to establish a baseline and then following restricted sleep. The team then produced a comprehensive metabolite profile from the blood of sleep-restricted rats and humans. Of the 38 metabolites they said were unique in the sleep-restricted rats, half were known lipids. The majority of the metabolites from the sleep-restricted human participants were also lipid or fatty acid-related compounds.

Seven kinds of a phospholipid called plasmalogens, related to oxidative stress, were elevated in the sleep-restricted rats. Overall, they found a significant shift in lipid metabolism, with sleep restriction, with higher levels of phospholipids in both rats and humans. The team found that some neurotransmitters and gut metabolites (possibly from intestinal microbes) are also altered because of sleep restriction.

According to Weljie, "While we don't yet know why the lipids are changed in both species, these shifts are very intriguing, given the epidemiological links between restricted sleep and metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, obesity, and metabolomics syndrome, I'm sure there's a connection."

When they compared the list of significantly altered metabolites in rats and humans to the baseline before sleep restriction, they found that two of the metabolites -- oxalic acid and diacylglycerol 36:3 - were depleted under sleep-restricted conditions and restored after recovery sleep in both species. Oxalic acid is a waste product derived from processing foods in the diet (plants, primarily from the breakdown of vitamin C and some amino acids). Diacylglycerol is a precursor molecule in the production of triglycerides, a molecule in which most fat is stored in the body, and also has a function in signaling in cells. The researchers suggest that these two molecules could serve as potential biomarkers since they are present in both species.

"These cross-species markers are exciting for a couple reasons," adds Weljie. "First, there is a need for quantitative markers of sleep debt and sleep quality, and this approach suggests that metabolites may be useful in this regard. Second, because we found the same metabolites in the humans and rats, it opens the door for us investigate mechanistic questions regarding the metabolic effects of sleep in rats that may have clinical and therapeutic application."

The work could provide a potential link between the known pathologies of reduced sleep duration and metabolic dysfunction. "This is consistent with other studies that suggest that one of the functions of sleep is restorative, involving clearance of metabolites in the brain and reinstating an antioxidant balance in peripheral tissues. Sleep loss, on the other hand, induces an oxidative metabolic state," said Sehgal.
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
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