MAR 11, 2015 2:54 PM PDT

Protein in the Brain Can 'Put the Brakes' On Binge Drinking

WRITTEN BY: Ilene Schneider
A new study led by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers has found that a naturally-occurring protein in the brain can act to suppress binge alcohol drinking, a major public health problem estimated to cost the U.S. more than $170 billion each year.

The study, published online by the journal Nature Neuroscience on March 9, was led by Thomas L. Kash, PhD, assistant professor in the departments of pharmacology and psychology and a member of UNC's Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies.

"Using a series of genetic and pharmacological approaches we identified how a compound in the brain, Neuropeptide Y (NPY), can suppress this dangerous behavior," Kash said.

"Specifically, we found that NPY acted in a part of the brain known as the extended amygdala (or bed nucleus of the stria terminalis) that we know is linked to both stress and reward. This anti-drinking effect was due to increasing inhibition (the brakes) on a specific population of cells that produce a ‘pro-drinking' molecule called corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). When we then mimicked the actions of NPY using engineered proteins, we were also able to suppress binge alcohol drinking in mice.

"Finally, we found that this anti-drinking NPY system is altered by long-term alcohol drinking in multiple species, suggesting that this may be either a marker or treatment for alcohol abuse," Kash said.

"The identification of where in the brain and how NPY blunts binge drinking, and the observation that the NPY system is compromised during early binge drinking prior to the transition to dependence, are novel and important observations," said study co-author Todd E. Thiele, Ph.D., professor of psychology at UNC and a member of the Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies. "What is particularly exciting is that these findings suggest that restoring NPY may not only be useful for treating alcohol use disorders, but may also protect some individuals from becoming alcohol dependent," said Thiele.

Source: UNC
About the Author
  • Ilene Schneider is the owner of Schneider the Writer, a firm that provides communications for health care, high technology and service enterprises. Her specialties include public relations, media relations, advertising, journalistic writing, editing, grant writing and corporate creativity consulting services. Prior to starting her own business in 1985, Ilene was editor of the Cleveland edition of TV Guide, associate editor of School Product News (Penton Publishing) and senior public relations representative at Beckman Instruments, Inc. She was profiled in a book, How to Open and Operate a Home-Based Writing Business and listed in Who's Who of American Women, Who's Who in Advertising and Who's Who in Media and Communications. She was the recipient of the Women in Communications, Inc. Clarion Award in advertising. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Ilene and her family have lived in Irvine, California, since 1978.
You May Also Like
NOV 10, 2019
Neuroscience
NOV 10, 2019
Gene Mutation Identified that Protects Agaist Dementia
For over two decades, researchers have been studying an extended family of over 1,200 people from Columbia known for having a rare genetic mutation that le...
DEC 13, 2019
Genetics & Genomics
DEC 13, 2019
Top Autism Gene Linked to Being Taller and Having a Big Head
People who carry certain mutations in gene CHD8, a gene strongly linked to autism, tend to be taller and have larger heads than the average person. They al...
DEC 20, 2019
Neuroscience
DEC 20, 2019
Are Migraines Caused by Unhealthy Gut Bacteria?
Research is increasingly pointing towards the importance of the gut-brain axis in regulating our health. Not only has the health of our gut bacteria, or mi...
DEC 25, 2019
Neuroscience
DEC 25, 2019
Air Pollution Linked to Depression and Suicide
Living amid high levels of air pollution increases one’s risk of developing depression and commiting suicide, says new research from University Colle...
JAN 28, 2020
Neuroscience
JAN 28, 2020
Gut Bacteria Influences Behavior in Young Children
Research now suggests that the presence of different gut bacteria may significantly impact children’s behavior, causing some to act out, and some to...
FEB 10, 2020
Neuroscience
FEB 10, 2020
Speaking "Parentese" to Baby Boosts Language Development
Speaking “parentese” with your baby, also known as “baby talk”, has been shown to enhance children’s linguistic abilities as...
Loading Comments...