JUL 09, 2018 07:30 PM PDT

Here's Why Rats Are So Difficult to Get Rid of

Rats are everywhere, especially in large cities like New York where food scraps and opportunities can be found around every corner.

But why are these rodents so difficult to get rid of? Perhaps for more reasons than you might think.

Rats are incredibly versatile animals; they can scale vertical walls, survive long trips through sewage pipes, and survive on the smallest bits of food. Furthermore, they tend to be rather witty, understanding common dangers imposed by traps and other attempts to control their populations.

Some cities have taken steps to reduce rat populations by making food scraps less readily available with inaccessible trash cans, but will it work? No one really knows...

As it would seem, rats are probably here to stay, and it doesn’t seem like any of the latest attempts to control their populations will have much of an impact.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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