APR 07, 2019 10:13 AM PDT

These Dogs Can Detect Seizures in Humans Before They Happen

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Dogs are commonly referred to as ‘man’s best friend,’ and as it would seem, this is far from a misnomer. Dogs serve as loyal pets to a significant portion of the human population; they even serve as service animals for the blind and as K9 sniffers for police, but that’s not even the end of the line for everyone’s favorite canine.

According to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, dogs have another incredible ability: they can use their powerful noses to detect seizures in humans before they ever happen. And if that seems astonishing, then consider this: many of the test dogs performed in this department with almost 100% accuracy apart from those that weren’t trained as long.

If your jaw hasn’t already dropped, then consider this: the dogs could detect a variety of different seizure types using odor molecule samples collected from people with epilepsy before, during, and after a seizure event. But perhaps more strikingly, the dogs could detect those samples when taken from different people rather than the same person repeatedly.

Seizures can be incredibly dangerous because they cause sudden and unpredictable changes in behavior, feelings, and/or body movements. Because of the circumstances, detecting a seizure before it happens can be life-changing, especially since it provides ample time to get that person into a safe place before a seizure transpires or to give them seizure-inhibiting drugs.

The findings are indeed preliminary, but it’s tough to argue a number as convincing as near-100% accuracy. With that in mind, it’s possible that all epileptics may one day have a trained seizure-detecting dog by their side.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
JAN 19, 2020
Earth & The Environment
JAN 19, 2020
Why aren't we meeting our forest restoration goals?
A new paper published recently in Conservation Letters hopes to encourage more support for countries aiming to meet their ambitious forest restoration goal
FEB 02, 2020
Plants & Animals
FEB 02, 2020
These Fish Beach Themselves When it Comes Time to Mate
Most fish probably cringe at the idea of beaching themselves on purpose, especially since they can’t breathe out of water. But this is something that
FEB 25, 2020
Plants & Animals
FEB 25, 2020
These Ants Do Whatever it Takes to Survive
Symbiotic relationships between different organisms in the wild are a wonderful thing. They exist in just about every ecosystem around the globe, including
MAR 04, 2020
Earth & The Environment
MAR 04, 2020
What is Turning Antarctica's Snow Red?
A phenomenon referred to as “watermelon,” “raspberry,” or even “blood” snow has turned Antarctica’s pristine whit
MAR 05, 2020
Earth & The Environment
MAR 05, 2020
Study Finds Some Corals Survived Mega-Bleaching Event
Rising ocean temperatures are dangerous for corals and the photosynthetic algae living within their tissues. The delicate, symbiotic relationship between c
MAR 19, 2020
Earth & The Environment
MAR 19, 2020
What's the Ocean's Oxygen Budget?
Have you heard the statement, “every other breath you take comes from the ocean?” Oxygen-producing phytoplankton are just one part of the oxyge
Loading Comments...