NOV 04, 2019 5:25 PM PST

What Makes Lions Such Incredible Predators?

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Lions sport a reputation as one of nature’s fiercest beasts, but have you ever wondered what makes them such renowned predators?

These large cats are nearly all muscle, with a full-grown adult weighing in at around 190 kilograms. Their powerful paws and jaws give them an edge when hunting prey, and if you thought that a single lion was fearsome enough, then you’ve probably never seen what an entire lion pride is capable of when they work together.

When lions work together, they can outsmart and team up on unsuspecting and unprepared prey. The ‘power in numbers’ idea enables a pride of lions to tackle much larger prey than they could on their own, and with that in mind, it’s not uncommon to see several lions going after massive beasts, including but not limited to elephants.

Prides are most often comprised of females and their closest relatives, along with their youngest offspring. Males are kicked out of the pride at around the age of two, which compels them to form alliances with other males. Many times, these alliances can be tricky, and the males will fight one another for dominance and to determine who gets to be in control.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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