JAN 19, 2020 6:55 AM PST

Flying Foxes Must be Careful of Crocodiles When Hydrating

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Flying foxes absolutely despise the Sun, and with that in mind, it should come as no surprise to anyone that they look for shade whenever possible. One problem, however, is that their ecosystem tends to get somewhat warm and dry during certain times of the year. Most flying foxes look for shade to evade the Sun, but they often fight with others over even the slightest bit of shelter.

In some cases, even the shade isn’t enough. Flying foxes will die if things get too toasty, and so many will pant and flap their wings in an attempt to cool off. When even that doesn’t do them any good, they’ll take flight and begin dipping their chests in nearby water sources mid-flight to give them something to lick later – a means of hydration until monsoon season kicks up.

Unfortunately, perusing these chest-dipping activities is particularly risky, and not all flying foxes make it out alive. It’s not so much the activity itself that poses the risk as it is the dangers lurking just beneath the surface – hungry freshwater crocodiles.

Crocodiles can slam their jaws shut in mere milliseconds, giving the flying foxes very little time to respond to the danger. In many cases, it’s a matter of which animal sees the other first, and whether the flying fox can get out of the crocodile’s striking zone before the crocodile makes it move.

In some cases, the flying foxes aren’t quick enough, and the crocodiles drag their catch below the surface…

Related: These are the oldest crocodile eggs ever found

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
DEC 03, 2019
Earth & The Environment
DEC 03, 2019
Small forests provide key ecosystem services
Due to human expansion in agriculture and livestock, logging, gas and oil exploration, and infrastructure expansion, forests today are more fragmented than...
DEC 17, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 17, 2019
Watch Seals Band Together to Scare a Great White Shark Away
Great white sharks are rather renowned for being massive and merciless predators of the ocean, and among their favorite prey are fur seals, which are rich...
DEC 23, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 23, 2019
The Captivating Mating Process of a Jumping Spider
When you’re a male jumping spider and you fancy finding a female to mate with, you might try your hand – or in this case paddle – at impr...
JAN 06, 2020
Cannabis Sciences
JAN 06, 2020
Psychedelics Linked to Stronger Connection to Nature
Taking psychedelic drugs, sometimes referred to as “tripping,” was recently shown to increase individuals’ “nature relatedness&rdqu...
JAN 06, 2020
Plants & Animals
JAN 06, 2020
Every River Leap a Proboscis Monkey Makes Could be its Last
Leaves are one of the most essential components of a proboscis monkey’s diet, and in some cases, getting to the tastiest leaves means taking an enorm...
JAN 09, 2020
Earth & The Environment
JAN 09, 2020
Australian Bushfire Update
Devastating wildfires continue to ravage the continent of Australia. The report from BBC News below, which aired earlier this week, gives an encompassing u...
Loading Comments...