DEC 05, 2015 09:36 AM PST

This Cat Can Now Walk Again Thanks to Some Titanium Prosthetic Legs

A three-year-old domestic cat named Vincent was born with an abnormality where he didn’t have full working hind legs like a regular kitten would have. As a result, the cat has struggled its entire life to get around, and hindered his ability to do what other cats can do at his age.
 
The owner of the cat, Cindy Jones, found it injured, which is when she fell in love with it and wanted to take it home to give it a good life. The owner tried physical therapy and various other forms of giving the cat the ability to walk like a normal cat, but wasn’t so luck at getting the process to be successful.
 
Fortunately, however, medical researchers at Iowa State University have provided Vincent with an advanced set of titanium prosthetic legs that are helping Vincent to get around. Although Vincent can’t jump around just yet, he is getting up and walking and it’s expected that he’ll get more used to the prosthetic legs and become more daring in the future.
 

Vincent has received titanium prosthetic legs, and can now walk again.


“I anticipate that he’ll be jumping and doing really normal cat things very soon,” said Dr. Mary Sarah Bergh, the orthopedic that oversaw the attachment of the new titanium prosthetic legs.
 
The way that the titanium legs are made is so that the femur bone of Vincent’s legs can grow into the titanium legs, giving it a way to grow support and grow with Vincent. This, of course, leaves some exposure to the world, which is why the cat must be treated with ongoing antibiotics to prevent infection.
 
While the initial surgery to add the titanium prosthetic legs occurred in 2014, there have been other surgeries up to this point that have made the legs longer and that have improved the walking conditions for Vincent. Soon, the legs will be lengthened to the same length of the hind legs of a healthy cat, which will give Vincent time to learn the legs by the time they’re normal length.
 
“His bone is looking great. The implants are stable, and he’s walking really well on them,” she said. “I couldn’t be happier with how he’s doing at the current time.”
 

 
The research is being used for training that will assist in future cases like Vincent’s, such that additional house pets can undergo similar treatments when they’re unable to walk due to injury or birth defects.

Source: Iowa State University

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
JUL 27, 2018
Cell & Molecular Biology
JUL 27, 2018
Getting Water From an Internal Source
When snakes were deprived of water they turned to muscle to fill their needs....
AUG 07, 2018
Plants & Animals
AUG 07, 2018
Crayfish Are Causing Mosquito Troubles in Southern California
A study published this week in the journal Conservation Biology by researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles divulges how invasive crayfis...
AUG 15, 2018
Neuroscience
AUG 15, 2018
Bees Know What Zero Means
There is much concern over the dwindling population of honey bees. They are needed for pollination and for ecosystems to stay in balance, but soon research...
AUG 15, 2018
Plants & Animals
AUG 15, 2018
Even Newer Pesticides Threaten Bees, Study Finds
Bees and other vital pollinators have experienced significant population declines in the face of widespread pesticide usage, especially in the case of neon...
AUG 24, 2018
Earth & The Environment
AUG 24, 2018
Zookeeper tricks panda mama into caring for her twins
  These baby pandas are only 18 days old and the fact that they're both alive right now is likely only due to the ingenuity and dedication of this...
AUG 28, 2018
Videos
AUG 28, 2018
While You Sleep This Parasitic Bug Could Chew on Your Face
It sounds like a horror movie. At night, while people are peacefully sleeping, a tiny bug crawls over their face, takes a bite, sucks some blood out, and a...
Loading Comments...