MAR 18, 2016 11:06 AM PDT

A Bald Eagle Hatches in Washington DC

A couple of bald eagles have been mating and nesting in the United States’ capital, Washinton DC, since October of 2014 for the first time since 1947. It's a relatively symbolic event, because the bald eagle is the national bird of the United States.

They are nesting high up in a Tulip Poplar tree located near the U.S. National Arboretum and the bald eagles have been given the names ‘Mr. President’ and ‘The First Lady’ as a result.
 
Although, on the morning of March 18th, something magical happened; a bald eagle chick emerged from its egg shell on the grounds of Washington DC.
 

 

We have an eaglet! Eaglet #1, which (for now) will be called DC2 in our educational chatroom (as this is the second...

Posted by American Eagle Foundation on Friday, March 18, 2016

 


Two high-definition cameras have been placed near the nesting place and can be monitored live by everyone from the internet. The cameras were placed by the American Eagle Foundation and are hosted by the United States Department of Agriculture.
 
The mother is currently seen on camera keeping her other egg warm (there are two!), and the egg is expected to hatch within the next few days following the first hatchling.
 

 

A screen-grab from live footage provided by the USDA.


The American Eagle Association notes that the first eaglet hatched from its shell at about 8:27 A.M. Friday morning, and has been given the nickname DC2 because it’s the second hatchling to be born and raised by these bald eagle parents in this location. The egg is cited to have began the hatching process at about 7:30 P.M. on March 16th.

It's unknown exactly when the second egg will hatch, but the American Eagle Association encourages everyone to take their best guesses on social media with the hashtag #DCEagleCam.
 


This is a beautiful beginning to a new life for a beautiful species, esepcially considering 13 bald eagles were found dead in the state of Maryland earlier this year. Although you can't replace them sentimentally, it's always good to see the species repopulating.


Source: American Eagle Association via Facebook

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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