MAR 20, 2016 9:09 AM PDT

Second Bald Eagle Hatches in Washington DC

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

A bald eagle couple, which has been nesting in a Tuplip Poplar tree near the U.S. National Arboretum in the nation’s capital since October 2014, is the first to do so since 1974. Symbolically, they’re the national bird of the United States and the couple is having babies right on Washington DC soil!
 
The two parents have been given the names ‘Mr. President’ and ‘The First Lady,’ while each of the offspring are being named DC1, DC2, DC3, etc.
 
Just after a bald eagle hatched in the nest of its parents in the United States’ capital of Washington DC at the end of this week, dubbed DC2, a second bald eagle has hatched in the same nest on Sunday morning as reported by the American Eagle Foundation. The new hatchling has been given the name DC3.
 

 

DC3 hatched early this morning on the #dceagelcam! There's going to be a whole lot of cuteness in the nest from here on...

Posted by American Eagle Foundation on Sunday, March 20, 2016


 
All of the action can be watched in real time in high definition from the American Eagle Foundation’s website, which is brought to you by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). There, you can actively switch between two camera angles and have the oppportunity to see the mother do interesting things.
 
Right now, the mother is sitting in her nest staying warm with her hatchling and is guarding some food; a fish she caught in a nearby water source.
 

The First Lady is guarding her hatchlings and keeping them warm.


Two more additions to the bald eagle population is a warm welcome after the mysterious death of 13 bald eagles on a Maryland farm earlier this year. Not only is it a fresh beginning two two more birds, but it’s also a great addition to the population.

Source: American Eagle Foundation/Facebook

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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