APR 20, 2016 2:38 PM PDT

New Zealand Yellow-Eyed Penguin is Closer Than Ever to Extinction

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

There’s a rare sight to behold in New Zealand, that is, if you can find it.
 
New Zealand’s yellow-eyed penguin continues to dwindle in numbers across the country. The endangered and shy yellow-eyed penguin is distinguished from other species by its bright yellow eyes and its yellow head, which includes the surroundings of its eyeballs.
 

New Zealand's yellow-eyed penguin is dwindling in numbers.


Around 10 years ago, experts believed there to be only about 6,000 of them remaining in the wild, but more modern surveys put that number around 2,000 instead.
 
With much their natural habitat having been bulldozed down for agriculture and livestock and burned down from natural fires over the course of the last several decades, they’ve hardly had anywhere to go all this time.
 
Nevertheless, they (what’s left of them) continue to survive in the small crevices of forestation that they’re able to find.
 
When they’re not in the forest, they’re in the water. Here, they often compete and fight with each other over food in order to survive, as fish population in the area hasn’t been all the great either.
 
It’s considered the rarest penguin species in the world, the New York Times reports, and since it’s so difficult to track these little creatures, there’s little we can do to preserve them.
 
Preservation efforts are in effect, but they’re not doing enough to save the species from near extinction status. The average survival rate out of 100 born chicks is said to be about 18, which is not a very good turnaround rate for the species.
 
The only way to preserve this species is going to be to ramp up preservation efforts even more than they are already, preventing more of their habitat from being destroyed.

Source: Care 2, New York Times

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
DEC 01, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 01, 2019
Polar Bear Fights Are Sometimes for Fun, Other Times to the Death
Polar bears have a reputation as being one of the top predators in the Arctic, and with that in mind, it should come as no surprise to anyone that males ca...
DEC 08, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 08, 2019
Female Baboons Avoid Mating When STDs Are Involved
In the animal kingdom, wild creatures are quite literally hard-wired to locate suitable mates and work as quickly as possible to ensure reproductive succes...
DEC 08, 2019
Earth & The Environment
DEC 08, 2019
Oilseed rape crops thrive under climate change
Research published recently in Current Biology points towards at least one upside of climate change: some agricultural crops will have longer growing seaso...
DEC 09, 2019
Neuroscience
DEC 09, 2019
Russian Cows Use VR Headsets to Increase Milk Production
Harsh weather conditions, particularly those found during winter months, are known to lead to a decrease in milk production among cows. To tackle this, Rus...
DEC 19, 2019
Earth & The Environment
DEC 19, 2019
Tiny Fossils Reveal California's Ocean Acidification History
A century’s worth of microscopic shells has revealed that ocean acidification is occurring in California waters at twice the rate of the global avera...
JAN 26, 2020
Plants & Animals
JAN 26, 2020
The Life of an Arctic Squirrel
There is no overstating the fact that the Arctic Tundra is a cold and unforgiving place. There are few plants or animals that can survive in this extremely...
Loading Comments...