MAY 17, 2016 9:31 AM PDT

Here's Why You Shouldn't Interact With Wild Bison

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

In a prime example of why humans should just leave wild animals alone in their wild habitat, a sad story for a wild baby bison from Yellowstone National park has made headlines this week.
 
The baby bison was rejected by its herd after it had been scooped up by a father and son and put into the back of an SUV because the concerned tourists believed that the animal was cold and alone.

A baby bison was scooped up by two worried park-goers.

The two were cited by law enforcement and fined $110 for disturbing wildlife in the area, which is against the law.
 
Park officials tried to release the baby bison to its herd, but as a result of intermingling with humans, the animal was no longer accepted and the herd moved on without the baby bison.
 
This is relatively common behavior for many kinds of animal species, including birds, and is why it’s recommended that you leave birds’ nests alone when you see them. Park rangers note that people should stay a good 25 yards away from wild animals, such as bison, to prevent predicaments like this one.
 
After having been scooped up by humans, the abandoned baby bison would start to go in search of more people and was dangerously approaching traffic.
 
As park officials knew that not having a herd to travel with would lead to a tragic end for the baby bison, having no group to protect or help feed it, the animal was euthanized such that it wouldn’t meet meet its doom either by starvation or from being struck by oncoming cars.
 

 
Bison have also been known to cause injuries and even death to humans who get too close. The park recently issued a statement suggesting that people do not get close to take selfies or interact directly with the animals in any way.

The best thing to do in most situations like this is to let wildlife be. Don't go scooping them up away from their habitats.

Source: Fox News

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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