MAY 23, 2016 10:07 AM PDT

Killer Nile Crocodiles Have Reportedly Surfaced in the State of Florida

Florida is home to all kinds of reptiles. Its humid and waterlogged environment makes it a great place for these types of animals to thrive, although there have recent been some sightings of an exotic species that, as far as researchers know, don’t actually belong there.
 
It’s not uncommon to see crocodiles in Florida, but in a weird change of events, researchers from the University of Florida have reportedly discovered a man-eating species of killer Nile crocodiles in the region.

Three nile crocodiles have been discovered and captured in Florida and more are expected to exist in the wild.

"They didn't swim from Africa," University of Florida herpetologist Kenneth Krysko said. "But we really don't know how they got into the wild."
 
The species, which are native to Africa, got here somehow and it’s stumping scientists. It’s unlikely that the creatures swam across the ocean to get to the United States, so they must have been imported in some way and then set free in the area to roam in the wild.
 
The species has been found in various swamps throughout the everglades and in Miami. One of them was even spotted on someone’s front porch of their house, which was clearly a shocking event for whoever had lived there.
 
These crocodile species can grow up to 18 feet long, and while there have been no local cases of the species attacking humans just yet, the growing number of discoveries of the creature is revealing alarmed emotions in scientists and locals.
 
Despite not having harmed anyone locally yet, Nile crocodiles were reportedly responsible for 480 attacks on humans and 128 casualties between the years 2010 and 2014 in their African homelands.
 
The species, which may have multiplied in the wild for all researches know, pose a threat to the many everglades visitors who roam to the area to get a good view of nature. Many of the visitors also don’t know how to distinguish between crocodiles and alligators, which means humans may inadvertently get too close to the deadly species and could lead to serious harm.
 
The only three known to exist in Florida’s wild have been captured for public safety, but there could be more out there.
 
Everyone in Florida will just have to be careful and not toy with the creatures.

Source: The Guardian

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
NOV 24, 2018
Genetics & Genomics
NOV 24, 2018
How Fish can Teach us About Mending a Broken Heart
Our world hosts some incredible organisms, some of which might help people create treatments for disease....
DEC 09, 2018
Drug Discovery
DEC 09, 2018
Insect Venom Can Someday Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Infections
Insect venom, such as those secreted by wasps and bees, are considered an insect’s immune system defense because of its richness in bacterial killing...
DEC 20, 2018
Genetics & Genomics
DEC 20, 2018
A Computational Tool for Unraveling the Genetics of Complex Traits
Genetic research has moved beyond the single mutation that causes a disease. Scientists want to know more about traits that are influenced by multiple genes....
DEC 24, 2018
Cell & Molecular Biology
DEC 24, 2018
Searching for the Secret of Planarians' Regenerative Abilities
There's nothing particularly striking about planarians on first glance, but they can regrow their whole body from a bit of tail....
JAN 16, 2019
Plants & Animals
JAN 16, 2019
Romeo, the 'World's Loneliest Frog,' Will Soon Meet His Juliet
In case you’ve never heard the story of Romeo the frog, he was once thought to be the last living specimen of the elusive Sehuencas water frog specie...
JAN 21, 2019
Plants & Animals
JAN 21, 2019
Fossilized Shark Teeth Provide Clues About a Species That Lived Alongside T. Rex
Standing tall in the display room of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois is Sue the T. Rex, an incredibly well-preserved specimen of e...
Loading Comments...