MAY 23, 2016 03:14 PM PDT

Drone Footage Shows Dozens of Sharks Snacking on a Whale

Australia can be one of the most interesting places to see nature at its finest, and for those with drones, you get a birds-eye view of all of it.
 
Sometimes, nature isn’t all walking through a field of flowers. There is a realistic sad truth to the circle of life that nature plays a big role in, and in this case, a drone captured footage of some of that so-called ‘sad truth.’

A humpback whale was the main dish for dozens of tiger sharks in Shark Bay near the coast of Western Australia.

Off the Western coast of the Australian continent, around 70 tiger sharks were filmed from above as they took turns nibbling on what appeared to be the carcass of a deceased humpback whale. The location of the deceased whale is known as Shark Bay for a very good reason; there are a lot of sharks there.
 
The video footage, which was originally shared on Facebook by Eco Abrolhos Cruises, has went viral, and can be watched below:
 


 
It’s unknown how the whale died, but the tiger sharks could care less – they’re just hungry!
 
The footage shows a trail of red (blood) engulfing the water around the whale carcass where the sharks are seen ripping it apart for food.
 
Shark Bay is not only home to sharks, but it’s also home to a number of other large marine animals including, but not limited to: whales, dolphins, turtles, and even dugongs.
 
Drones are being used for collecting all kinds of scientific data, and ecologists are seeing them as a useful tool for conducting animal population surveys all around the world.
 
I guess you could also say that drones are even useful for seeing animal behavior from up above without ever getting in the middle of their business and disturbing their natural behavior.

Source: Eco Abrolhos/Facebook: (1), (2)

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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