AUG 17, 2016 12:00 PM PDT

Scientists Study Large 1.2-meter Dinosaur Footprint in Bolivia

Dinosaurs may not walk the Earth anymore, but they’ve left behind several clues to their existence millions of years ago. Among those are fossils, bones, and even footprints. Scientists are always coming across these clues, and one of the places in the world where these kinds of discoveries are common is South America.
 
Around 40 miles away from the city of Sucre in central Bolivia, a tourist guide found a large footprint that scientists are now saying came from a carnivorous dinosaur known as an Abelisaurus that was much larger than average.
 

Scientist Sebastian Apesteguia poses for a photo next to the massive footprint.

 Image Credit: CNN/Twitter

Although scientists estimate that these creatures may have averaged around 9 meters long, this footprint suggests the creature was anywhere from 12-15 meters long.
 
"This print is bigger than any other we have found to date in the area," Argentine paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia said. "It is a record in size for carnivorous dinosaurs from the end of the Cretaceous period in South America."
 
The largest footprint was once about 110 centimeters in length, but this new one takes the cake at 115 centimeters in length. Scientists date the 1.2-meter footprint back as early as 80 million years ago, and it remains well preserved to this day.
 
The Abelisaurus probably closely resembled the Tyrannosaurus Rex in many ways, and bones recovered from the area suggest a similar body structure.
 
Finding hidden gems like these is important because it allows us to see the world through a different lens; one that lets us peer into the history of our planet and the creatures that once walked upon its surface.
 
Source: Reuters via Inqusitr

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
NOV 07, 2018
Plants & Animals
NOV 07, 2018
Experts Thought This Octopus Was a Male, and it Just Had Thousands of Babies
Caretakers for what was initially thought to be a ‘male’ octopus named Octavian at the University of Georgia’s Marine Education Center an...
NOV 14, 2018
Plants & Animals
NOV 14, 2018
Conservationists Report Positive Shift for Mountain Gorilla Populations
The mountain gorilla is one of two subspecies of the Eastern gorilla (Gorilla beringei), a species recognized by the International Union for Conservation o...
NOV 25, 2018
Technology
NOV 25, 2018
Designing Leaping Robots Inspired from Jumping Aquatic Animals
Curious about the physical conditions that enable aquatic animals to leap out of water in such a graceful manner—researchers at Cornell University we...
NOV 29, 2018
Microbiology
NOV 29, 2018
Bacteria may Explain the Symbiotic Relationship of Anemones & Clownfish
Sea anemones normally kill and eat fish. But clownfish can nestle into anemones without getting stung....
DEC 24, 2018
Plants & Animals
DEC 24, 2018
Decoding the Secrets of Howler Monkey Evolution
There exist a bevy of ways that an animal species can be driven to evolve, but one of the more controversial methods of evolution involves a process known...
DEC 30, 2018
Videos
DEC 30, 2018
Trump's wall would destroy National Butterfly Center
Hundreds of thousands of butterflies pass through the center’s 100-acre sanctuary in Mission every year, including the well-known monarch and endange...
Loading Comments...