SEP 04, 2016 09:24 AM PDT

A Fisherman Has Been Hiding the World's Largest Pearl for a Decade

A fisherman native to the Philippines has reportedly been hiding a massive 75-pound pearl under his bed for last decade. In terms of size, it’s approximately 2 feet long by 1 foot wide.
 

 Image Credit: Aileen Cynthia Amurao/SWNS.com

The fisherman is said to have discovered this gem inside of a giant clam while fishing, and he kept it under his bed for good fortune.
 
It wasn’t revealed by the fisherman himself, but rather by the person he lent it to: Aileen Cynthia Maggay-Amurao. She was said to have obtained the pearl for “safekeeping” after the fisherman moved from the location where he was storing it because it was too heavy to take with him.
 
If legitimate, this would be the world’s largest pearl on record to date. The second-largest pearl was “The Pearl of Lao Tzu,” which weighs 14 pounds and was valued at $93 million in 2003 according to the The Guardian.
 
A mere fraction of what this 75-pound pearl weighs, you can imagine that Maggay-Amurao can’t wait to get this beastly freak of nature appraised. In the meantime, the pearl is currently on display to the public at the city hall of Puerto Princesa and has been given the name "The Pearl of Puerto."
 


 
Because the pearl still technically belongs to the fisherman, according to the Puerto Princesa government, he might be in for surprise once the appraisal is complete. He may have something in his possession that’s worth millions of dollars and may not have even known it.

Although the backstory behind how the pearl came to be discovered sounds far-fetched, one thing's for sure: we're definitely looking at the world's largest pearl here. It should be interesting to find out what it gets appraised for.
 
Source: The Guardian via NPR, Wikipedia

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
SEP 10, 2018
Plants & Animals
SEP 10, 2018
Does the Weather Impact Your Likelihood of Being Bitten by a Rattlesnake?
Venomous snakes, especially rattlesnakes, sport a somewhat salty reputation for biting humans when threatened in their natural habitat. Another frequently-...
OCT 10, 2018
Plants & Animals
OCT 10, 2018
Like Humans, Chimpanzees Share Food with Their Closest Peers
People often share food with their friends, not only because it’s fun, but also because we evolved from a time in which our ancestors shared food to...
OCT 22, 2018
Genetics & Genomics
OCT 22, 2018
Duplication Events in the Genome Drive Evolution
The majority of plants that grow in the wild and on farms have undergone some kind of duplication event in their genomes....
NOV 06, 2018
Plants & Animals
NOV 06, 2018
How do Moths Avoid Being Eaten by Bats? The Secret Might Lie in Their 'Fur'
It’s no secret that bats enjoy munching on moths when they’re feeling a bit hungry, but one thing that has always captivated scientists is how...
NOV 13, 2018
Plants & Animals
NOV 13, 2018
Conservation Efforts Are Helping Amazon Turtle Populations Bounce Back
It’s not too often that conservationists get the chance to share a successful conservation story, but as it would seem, nearly 40 years’ worth...
NOV 14, 2018
Plants & Animals
NOV 14, 2018
Conservationists Report Positive Shift for Mountain Gorilla Populations
The mountain gorilla is one of two subspecies of the Eastern gorilla (Gorilla beringei), a species recognized by the International Union for Conservation o...
Loading Comments...