OCT 10, 2016 11:44 AM PDT

African Penguin Stolen From Oceanarium Now Fights for Life in the Wild

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

An African Penguin known as Buddy to Bayworld Oceanarium in Port Elizabeth may now be struggling to survive in the wild after two early 20’s male activists reportedly broke into the oceanarium at night and removed the penguin from the premises to free it.
 
The penguin was released into the wild in the Indian Ocean and experts say it was a dangerous mistake because having been raised inside of the oceanarium for so long, Buddy doesn’t have the skills necessary to survive in the wild.
 

The African black-footed penguin is close to making the endangered species list, and now one that was used to pampering from humans will have to fight for its life in the wild.

 
“He is completely ill-equipped to survive in the wild. He will have no idea where he is,” said Dylan Bailey, the manager of the Bayworld Oceanarium. “Luckily, he was a very healthy penguin - actually quite fat - so he has a good few weeks of reserves.”
 
Buddy is tagged on one of his flippers and has a microchip embedded in his body that will make identification easier; unfortunately, that chip doesn’t include GPS, so there’s no way to track the penguin and find it easily.
 
Experts will have the search the wild far and wide for Buddy and check the flippers of all spotted penguins until they find their lost specimen.
 
“We are optimistic,” Bailey said. “We have hope he will come ashore before he becomes too weak.”
 
Fortunately, Buddy may have enough body fat to keep him afloat in the wild for a little while, making it a little easier on search teams to continue their search.
 
Unfortunately, since Buddy is lacking the hunting skills necessary to survive long-term in the wild, it’s unlikely he would be able to survive on his own for lone. With that being said, experts are rushing to try and find him.
 
Bailey acknowledges that the two men had good intentions, but their actions may have long-term consequences for the penguin itself. They were charged by authorities and brought into court where they were let off with a warning.
 
Security cameras captured the two young men during their hoist, and can be watched below:
 


Source: BBC

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
MAY 11, 2020
Plants & Animals
Ever Wonder How a Bee Ascends to the Rank of Queen?
MAY 11, 2020
Ever Wonder How a Bee Ascends to the Rank of Queen?
Virtually every beehive sports its own queen bee, but there can be only one. Beneath her are hundreds or thousands of pe ...
MAY 14, 2020
Microbiology
Cats Can Get Infected by SARS-CoV-2 and Transmit It to Other Cats
MAY 14, 2020
Cats Can Get Infected by SARS-CoV-2 and Transmit It to Other Cats
New research reported in the New England Journal of Medicine has indicated that domestic cats can easily be infected wit ...
MAY 25, 2020
Plants & Animals
Ever Wonder How Some Fish Produce Electricity?
MAY 25, 2020
Ever Wonder How Some Fish Produce Electricity?
When you hear the term ‘electric fish,’ the first thing that probably comes to mind is the infamous electric ...
JUN 10, 2020
Neuroscience
Monkeys More Responsive to Hyper-Realistic Animations of Monkeys
JUN 10, 2020
Monkeys More Responsive to Hyper-Realistic Animations of Monkeys
Video:  More about Uncanny Valley Syndrome from MOCH it.   Rhesus macaques are a species of monkey often used ...
JUN 29, 2020
Cannabis Sciences
Should You Give Cannabis to Your Cat?
JUN 29, 2020
Should You Give Cannabis to Your Cat?
There is very limited research on the effects of cannabinoids on pets. Although some studies have emerged touting their ...
JUL 20, 2020
Earth & The Environment
Ectotherm thermal physiology puts amphibians at even greater climate risk than previously recognized
JUL 20, 2020
Ectotherm thermal physiology puts amphibians at even greater climate risk than previously recognized
Things aren’t looking good for amphibians. According to new research published in Global Change Biology from Simon ...
Loading Comments...