JAN 14, 2017 10:12 AM PST

New Polar Bear Conservation Plan Could Be the Last Chance to Save the Species

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

In a Conservation Management Plan released by the United States Fish and Wildlife service this week, climate change was unsurprisingly announced to be the single biggest primary threat against the existence of polar bears in the arctic.

Polar bears are losing traction as Arctic ice continues to melt.

Image Credit: Gellinger/Pixabay

The plan talks about the importance of saving the species, which has sadly become one of the most recognizable mascots of the effects of climate change, noting that other factors also impact their numbers, such as human-bear conflict, Alaskan hunting, and even those dangerous oil spills that happen from time to time among other things.

“This plan outlines the necessary actions and concrete commitments by the Service and our state, tribal, federal and international partners to protect polar bears in the near term,” Greg Siekaniec, FWS Alaska Regional Director, said in a prepared statement. “But make no mistake; without decisive action to address Arctic warming, the long-term fate of this species is uncertain.”

The plan calls for immediate action to start saving the species, which is currently listed as a threatened species as the fate of their place in this world remains vastly unknown.

The arctic is their happy place, where they can use the ice there to get close to the water’s edge and hunt for seals. Unfortunately, much of the ice is melting, causing it to crack and break away, meaning the bears are having a hard time getting to the seals that they like to eat, so instead, they starve.

“The current global polar bear population is estimated to be 26,000,” the Fish and Wildlife Service explained. “If greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise at the current rates throughout the 21st century, polar bears will likely disappear from much of their present-day range.

While figuring out what we can do to save the species is no easy task, the plan comes up with some ideas for what we can do to help slow down their demise, hopefully giving their numbers a chance to rebound.

While not everyone on the planet agrees with climate change, there is irrefutable proof that it’s happening and at an alarming rate. It would be horrible to see these creatures suffer a fate that could have been prevented.

Source: FWS (1), (2)

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
NOV 25, 2019
Plants & Animals
NOV 25, 2019
Here's What Makes Fleas Such a Problem
Fleas are known as one of the world’s peskiest insects, not only because they can compel you itch incessantly, but also because they have a reputatio...
DEC 08, 2019
Plants & Animals
DEC 08, 2019
What's Inside a Pufferfish May Surprise You
Pufferfish are among one of the most easily discernable fish in the ocean, especially when inflated. But do you know how these little fish are able to expa...
DEC 19, 2019
Earth & The Environment
DEC 19, 2019
Tiny Fossils Reveal California's Ocean Acidification History
A century’s worth of microscopic shells has revealed that ocean acidification is occurring in California waters at twice the rate of the global avera...
JAN 07, 2020
Clinical & Molecular DX
JAN 07, 2020
Kiss and tell: new test for kissing bug disease
Here’s one Latin lover that you do not want to get kissed by: triatomines, or “kissing bugs”. Known locally as pitos or chipos, these ins...
FEB 02, 2020
Plants & Animals
FEB 02, 2020
These Fish Beach Themselves When it Comes Time to Mate
Most fish probably cringe at the idea of beaching themselves on purpose, especially since they can’t breathe out of water. But this is something that...
FEB 10, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
FEB 10, 2020
The Broken Genes of the Last Woolly Mammoths
Wooly mammoths are thought to have died out around 4,000 years ago in a remote area off the Siberian coast, called Wrangel Island....
Loading Comments...