MAR 14, 2015 06:58 AM PDT

Out for a Walk

Life is good for these cubs born in the Ouwehands Zoo in the Netherlands. Their mother gave birth to triplet cubs on November 22, 2014, but sadly one of the cubs, named Swimmer, died soon after birth. This photo, taken on February 19, 2015 marks the first time the cubs were seen outside their enclosure.
A momma polar bear takes her cubs on a stroll at there home in the Ouwehands Zoo in Rhenen, Netherlands
About the Author
  • I'm a writer living in the Boston area. My interests include cancer research, cardiology and neuroscience. I want to be part of using the Internet and social media to educate professionals and patients in a collaborative environment.
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