FEB 22, 2017 9:31 AM PST

This Fish Was Frozen Solid by Nature While Swallowing Another Fish

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

It was just at the end of last year that Alaskan photographers came across the discovery of two moose that were frozen in time during an epic clash. Their antlers became interlocked and stuck together as they stood in the middle of a flowing river. Unable to detach from one another, and in the middle of the river during the cold months, it froze right over them.

While rare, there are a number of documented events where wildlife can become frozen solid in the middle of epic actions, and another interesting discovery comes from Indiana, where two brothers came across a bass that appears to have been frozen solid in a lake while in the middle of devouring a pike.

The bass that was caught in the middle of choking down a pike as it became frozen in ice by nature.

Image Credit: Anton Babich/Facebook

The photo was shared to Facebook by the discoverers, Anton and Alex Babich, which is where it had gone viral originally, and the response led the brothers to upload a video of the chunk of ice being cut out of the lake to YouTube, where it got mad views once again:

The chainsaw made it possible to extract the chunk of ice that contained the fish eating another fish. After cutting, the fish were preserved in mid-munch in a giant ice cube and could be observed more easily:

It’s not really understood how the creatures were frozen in time like this, although one possibility is that the bass could have choked on the pike, which wasn’t a small fish by any means of the definition, and after floating to the top of the lake, the chilly weather went to work on hardening the lake’s surface (with the fish inside of it).

Since the fish were likely floating at the top of the lake, already dead prior to being frozen over, they became encapsulated in the layer of ice at the top of the lake, which left behind this remnant to be discovered.

Who knows what else might be found perfectly preserved in ice before nature’s thawing process begins in the next few months.

Source: National Geographic

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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