MAR 19, 2015 06:21 AM PDT

New Arrivals

Hitching a ride on shipping containers is likely how these spiders from the Far East arrived in the United States. Known in Korean mythology as "mudang gume" or "fortune teller" spiders, they are harmless to humans. They can be as large as a human hand and are distinctive by their swirled colors of red, black and yellow.
This Joro spider, pictured in Japan, has a few friends who have come to the United States
Source: National Geographic
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