AUG 14, 2017 7:31 AM PDT

Rare All-White Moose Spotted in Sweden

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Camera-bearing nature explorers snagged a rare opportunity to film an elusive all-white moose in Värmland, located in western Sweden.

The white moose is a rare sight in Sweden.

Image Credit: BBC

Indeed, the creature is just as beautiful as it is polarizing.

The moose was crossing a body of water when an explorer picked up his camera and began recording footage in the animal's natural habitat. Once the moose made it across the water, it shook off all the wetness and started munching on plants.

Although it looks an albino moose at first glance, then you might want to do a double-take because experts quickly stepped in and pointed out how this isn’t the case. If it were albino, then the moose would also have pink or red eyes, which it doesn't.

Instead, we can attribute the all-white fur to a genetic mutation. No other part of the moose's body underneath would appear out of the ordinary if examined up close in this particular scenario. Nevertheless, it's difficult to show this since the cameraman kept a safe distance from the animal.

Related: Rare white giraffe is photographed in Tanzania

There are purportedly just 100 white moose living in the entire country of Sweden today, which speaks for the rarity of this mutation occurring in the wild. But why is this mutation so rare in the species? Natural selection might hold the answer.

White fur doesn’t blend in well with the rest of nature’s surroundings like typical dark colors would, so it's non-advantageous. Predators find it easier to spot and hunt bright white creatures, whether it’s a moose or another kind of animal with similar genetic mutations. Moose don't have too many predators to worry about because of their size, but teams of wolves are sometimes known to target them, as are larger bears.

Related: Two moose were frozen in time during an epic battle to the death

Bright white animals’ lower odds of survival in the wild might explain why we don’t see very many moose like this one. Nevertheless, it’s still an awe-inspiring sight to behold.

Source: BBC

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
AUG 02, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
In a First, Researchers Edit Cephalopod Genes
AUG 02, 2020
In a First, Researchers Edit Cephalopod Genes
Using the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool, researchers have knocked out a gene in a cephalopod for the first time.
SEP 17, 2020
Microbiology
Animals May Sense the Magnetic Field Because of Bacteria
SEP 17, 2020
Animals May Sense the Magnetic Field Because of Bacteria
Animals can sense magnetism, an ability called magnetoreception. Scientists have been trying to understand this sense, w ...
SEP 17, 2020
Genetics & Genomics
Revealing More About the Past With a New Metagenomic Technique
SEP 17, 2020
Revealing More About the Past With a New Metagenomic Technique
Scientists can use advanced genomics techniques to mine samples for all the genetic material they contain.
SEP 24, 2020
Plants & Animals
High Arctic Polar Bears are Temporarily Benefitting from Climate Change
SEP 24, 2020
High Arctic Polar Bears are Temporarily Benefitting from Climate Change
For the past few decades, polar bears have been harbingers of climate change. However, not every polar bear subpopu ...
OCT 05, 2020
Plants & Animals
Bacteria Caused the Deaths of Hundreds of Elephants
OCT 05, 2020
Bacteria Caused the Deaths of Hundreds of Elephants
African elephants are a threatened species that are increasing in some areas but at risk in many others. There are proba ...
OCT 07, 2020
Plants & Animals
Tasmanian Devils Return to Mainland Australia
OCT 07, 2020
Tasmanian Devils Return to Mainland Australia
For the first time in about 3,000 years, Tasmanian devils have returned to mainland Australia. According to a report fro ...
Loading Comments...