JUL 05, 2015 02:43 PM PDT

Russian Spacecraft Successfully Provides International Space Station With Supplies

Those stranded aboard the International Space Station can finally sit back and relax on Sunday.

Although the recent SpaceX Falcon 9 spacecraft mission that was intended to deliver the space station its necessary replenishment of food, fuel, oxygen, science equipment, and other goodies to keep the astronauts alive exploded in mid-air in an attempt to leave Earth's atmosphere about a week ago, it would appear that Russia's turn to try and send the space station equipment was a success.

Russian ship M-28M reached the International Space Station With Supplies on Sunday.

The Russian cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station right now refer to the successful launch and delivery on Sunday as ‘Christmas in July.'

"The transport cargo ship Progress M-28M has docked with the... Russian segment of the ISS at 10:11am Moscow time (0711 GMT)," the Russian federal space agency (Roscosmos) says.

Although those aboard the International Space Station only had enough supplies to make it through to September before the successful mission on Sunday, the new supplies should now give them plenty more time to survive aboard the space station.

You can only imagine the look on the cosmonauts' faces as the shipments arrived at the space station successfully and then managed to dock successfully with all of the supplies the cosmonauts had been looking forward to getting. "Congratulations guys, your cargo ship has arrived," Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka said to ground control.

The ship that made the delivery was Russia's M-28M cargo ship, which is pictured above. It was an un-manned ship indented only for delivery purposes. The ship could be seen rocketing up towards the International Space Station after its launch.

More people are scheduled to be sent up to the International Space Station later this month, which means the supplies couldn't have arrived at a better time. It's better that the supplies are already there when the new astronauts arrive than get the astronauts there first and then fail again to provide them with the necessary supplies.



Another happy ending in the world of space travel.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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