JUL 22, 2015 11:49 PM PDT

Three New Astronauts Dock At the International Space Station

Just last month, three astronauts from the International Space Station returned to Earth: Terry Virts of NASA, Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency, and Anton Shkaplerov of Russia.

Now, three new astronauts have successfully made it to the International Space Station on Wednesday, effectively taking the previous astronauts' places and making it so that new minds can work on the International Space Station to perform experiments and monitor the things space agencies need monitored.

They blasted off into the skies from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan from within a Russian Soyuz rocket, and soon after, docked with the International Space Station successfully where they then joined Scott Kelly, Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka, all of which were already aboard the International Space Station when they had arrived.

Kjell Lindgren, Kimiya Yui, and Oleg Kononenko sit together after docking with the ISS.

The new spacemen, pictured, include American astronaut Kjell Lindgren, Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko. They will remain on the International Space Station for a minimum of five months, and are scheduled to return to Earth on December 22nd.

The new astronauts will fortunately have plenty of supplies to last them their stay, as a Russian cargo ship recently succeeded to replenish the necessities aboard the International Space Station following the failed launch attempt of NASA's SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

As manned space operations are dangerous and nerve-wracking, it's excellent to see that they arrived at the International Space Station safely and can continue research that could benefit humanity's understanding of outer space in many positive ways.



Source: The Guardian

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
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