FEB 04, 2016 10:59 AM PST

Tim Peake Turns on 'Astro Pi' Computers on the ISS

Along with all the dangerous spacewalks and living with the dangers of orbiting the Earth in microgravity, astronauts on the International Space Station also have a ton of fun conducting various experiments in space to see what happens in the microgravitational environment.
 
One of the most recent involves a set of modified Raspberry Pi computers, which have been renamed ‘Astro Pi’ computers. They’re perfect for this experiment because the computers are cheap, at just $5 each, and they’re very capable.
 

Two 'Astro Pi' computers have been powered on on the International Space Station to collect data for students.


They’re modified in that they have new technology (Sense HAT) attached to them, such as instruments like gyroscopes, accelerometers, magnetometers, thermometers, barometers, and other fun sensors that can be used to collect data.
 
What’s more is the computers were created and programmed by students throughout the United Kingdom, so it’s a bit of a cheery day for all of those who played a part in bringing the computers together to be used on the International Space Station.
 
When the computers have finished collecting data, the results will be sent back to Earth to the students who created the computers, which will allow them to have fulfilled an experiment of their own from the safety of Earth.
 
European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake has already fired on the computers this week, as he revealed on Twitter, and they’re already beginning to measure various types of data for the students, and they will continue to do so until Peake is scheduled to return to Earth.
 

Turning on @astro_pi in Columbus space laboratory today, standby for switch on. #Principia pic.twitter.com/azsfVfyuGA

— Tim Peake (@astro_timpeake) February 2, 2016


 
It should be very interesting to see what kinds of data Peake will provide to the students and what the students will find.

Source: Twitter via Wired

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
JUL 29, 2018
Space & Astronomy
JUL 29, 2018
Friday's 'Blood Moon' Dubbed the "Longest of the 21st Century"
Depending on location, those that turned their attention to the night sky on Friday, July 27th might have noticed a particularly red Moon. Experts refer to...
AUG 08, 2018
Space & Astronomy
AUG 08, 2018
Here's Why NASA is Sending a Probe to the Sun
An upcoming NASA probe will fly closer to the Sun than any before it. Known as the Parker Solar Probe, this spacecraft will study the Sun and many of its q...
AUG 13, 2018
Space & Astronomy
AUG 13, 2018
Giant Star Sets Record for Lithium Composition, Researchers Say
While scanning far and wide with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), astronomers from the National Astronomical Observa...
AUG 29, 2018
Space & Astronomy
AUG 29, 2018
Ever Wonder How Long it Takes to Get to Mars? Watch This
Sending missions to Mars isn’t as easy as it may seem at first glance. The solar system is continuously shifting as planets orbit the Sun, so it&rsqu...
SEP 03, 2018
Space & Astronomy
SEP 03, 2018
The Moon is Close, So Why Don't We Colonize it Instead of Mars?
If you’ve been paying any attention to NASA and SpaceX lately, then you might’ve caught wind about their mutual interest in colonizing Mars wit...
SEP 17, 2018
Space & Astronomy
SEP 17, 2018
How Common Are Planetary Collisions?
Outer space is nothing short of a galactic free-for-all. Space rocks fly in virtually every direction, sporadically impacting larger objects like moons, pl...
Loading Comments...