OCT 06, 2016 08:49 AM PDT

Blue Origin Impresses by Landing its New Shepard Rocket Again

WRITTEN BY: Anthony Bouchard

Blue Origin has surprised the world this week by doing something we never thought was going to happen.
 
After testing the safety of its commercial spacecraft payload on Wednesday, the company attempted to land its New Shepard rocket on solid ground despite the warnings from the company’s rocket scientists that it was likely the company would lose its historic rocket during the part where the payload separated from the rocket with 70,000 pounds of off-axis force.
 

Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket came in for a successful ground landing even following the doubt against it landing successfull after the safety test.

 Image Credit: Blue Origin

Nevertheless, Blue Origin appears to have managed to land their New Shepard rocket successfully for a fifth time, not only making history, but also shattering the reputation of nay-sayers all the world.
 
As it seems, the New Shepard rocket is one heck of a reliable rocket system.
 
As the safety test was carried out, an engine on board the commercial spacecraft payload lifted it above the rocket while it burned for several seconds. After the payload was separated from the rocket and at a safe distance, it deployed parachutes to make a safe, soft landing, which would be important if it were carrying human cargo.
 
Although New Shepard is not intended for deep space orbit penetration like SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket is, it’s still a rocket nonetheless, and it shows that rocket science has come a long way; so far, that we can actually land and re-use those rockets rather than building a new one each and every time we want to go into space.
 
This kind of technology, paired with a successful safety system, means that commercial space flight is not far off. Every day people will soon be able to buy tickets to take a joyride into space without a NASA astronaut uniform.

You can watch a video of the launch and landing below:
 


Blue Origin CEO Jeff Bezos now just needs to honor his words and put the now fifth-landed New Shepard rocket in a museum and throw a party for the company’s success.

Source: Ars Technica

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
DEC 12, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 12, 2019
Will Humans One Day Give Birth in Space?
Deep space missions are becoming an increasingly relevant topic of discussion in the space community these days, and perhaps unsurprisingly, this often lea...
DEC 12, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 12, 2019
What NASA's TESS Mission Has Accomplished Thus Far
Astronomers are particularly interested in finding an exoplanet like the Earth, and with the help of NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, al...
DEC 12, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 12, 2019
A More Practical Theory Regarding Tabby's Star
A distant star system called KIC 8462852, also commonly known as ‘Tabby’s Star,’ has a particularly interesting reputation for dimming sp...
DEC 12, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 12, 2019
How Much Do You Know About NASA's Voyager Missions?
NASA’s Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft each launched in 1977 for a unique opportunity to explore the solar system’s outermost planets in unprecedent...
DEC 12, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 12, 2019
NASA Wants Visit Pluto and Beyond... Again
Most probably remember the historic moments in the Summer of 2015 when NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew past the dwarf planet Pluto to capture the...
DEC 12, 2019
Space & Astronomy
DEC 12, 2019
SpaceX Puts Another 60 Starlink Satellites Into Orbit
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket that stood tall and proud at the launch pad at Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station ignited its engines and lofted a g...
Loading Comments...