DEC 14, 2017 09:10 AM PST

ISS Crew Count Slashed in Half As Three Space Men Return Home

The cycle continues for both astronauts and cosmonauts working onboard the International Space Station as three men from space return home.

The Soyuz spacecraft touches down in Kazakhstan with three ISS crew members on Thursday.

Image Credit: IngallsImages via Jack Fischer (Twitter)

Randy Bresnik of NASA, Paolo Nespoli of the ESA, and Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos have each returned to Earth in time for the holidays after spending 139 days in space from the Earth-orbiting space lab that we call the International Space Station.

The return mission slashed the current International Space Station crew count from six to three, leaving Joe Acaba and Mark Vande Hei of NASA and Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos to fend for themselves until new crew members eventually replace the homebound men.

Bresnik, Nespoli, and Ryazanskiy all hitched a ride on a Russian Soyuz MS-05 space capsule, which landed in Kazakhstan on Thursday with the help of a parachute-assisted landing system. The spacecraft reportedly touched down at approximately 3:37 A.M. Eastern time.

A few minutes after the spacecraft contacted the ground, an extraction crew visited the landing site to greet the astronauts and cosmonaut and conduct preliminary health checkups. As it would seem, everyone made it back home safely.

Related: The United States and Russia will soon collaborate on the world's first lunar-orbiting space station

It won’t be long before the International Space Station returns to full capacity. Three new crew members, including Scott Tingle of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos, and Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency will take off from a Soyuz MS-07 spacecraft on Sunday, December 17th and join the remaining crew members.

Notably, an International Space Station resupply mission initially slated for launch earlier this week saw unexpected delays. Now rescheduled for Friday, that launch should provide the new crew members with plenty of supplies and science experiments to keep them busy when they arrive.

Source: NASA, Phys.org, Jack Fischer (Twitter)

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
JUN 04, 2018
Space & Astronomy
JUN 04, 2018
SpaceX Launched a Satellite Today, But Didn't Recover the Rocket
A SpaceX-branded Falcon 9 rocket ignited all nine of its Merlin engines at a Cape Canaveral, Florida-based launch pad at 12:45 A.M. Eastern time on Monday...
JUN 27, 2018
Space & Astronomy
JUN 27, 2018
The James Webb Space Telescope Just Got Delayed... Again
Astronomers and planetary scientists are getting antsy to make use of NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to reveal more secrets about...
JUL 15, 2018
Videos
JUL 15, 2018
Meet the Rare Binary Asteroid Recently Confirmed by NASA
Astronomers first became aware of an asteroid called YE5 in December of 2017, but something seemed odd about it after they were unable to discern its physi...
JUL 18, 2018
Space & Astronomy
JUL 18, 2018
Blue Origin's Ninth Test Launch Yields Spectacular Results
On Wednesday, commercial space company Blue Origin performed an “extreme” test launch of its New Shepard rocket and crew capsule system. Image...
AUG 22, 2018
Chemistry & Physics
AUG 22, 2018
The Universe is Expanding, But How Fast?
Since the Big Bang, our universe has never ceased expanding. The rate of cosmic expansion, now known as the Hubble Constant, was first defined by Belgian a...
AUG 26, 2018
Space & Astronomy
AUG 26, 2018
NASA's OSIRIS-REx Spacecraft Snaps its First Picture of Bennu
NASA’s Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is now one step closer to realizing...
Loading Comments...