APR 10, 2015 06:27 PM PDT

On the ISS, Which Way Is Up As You Fly Over Down Under?

Space twin Scott Kelley took this picture of Australia as he began his year-long mission on the ISS.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (part of the "Twins In Spaaaace!" year-long study) took this photograph and posted it to social media on April 6, writing, "Australia. You are very beautiful. Thank you for being there to brighten our day. #YearInSpace"
About the Author
  • Andrew J. Dunlop lives and writes in a little town near Boston. He's interested in space, the Earth, and the way that humans and other species live on it.
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