JAN 30, 2019 07:46 PM PST

The Science Behind Staring At Digital Screens All Day

Lots of people spend more time staring at digital screens than they should. Significant amounts of the population work on the computer all day long, then return home to enjoy some television, and then go to sleep after checking social media and texting on their smartphone. But how does all that screen time impact your body?

People who spend more time than they should staring at digital screens are prime candidates for developing computer vision syndrome. This condition is responsible for all kinds of nasty side-effects, including eyestrain, blurred vision, headaches, and pain in the neck and back. But prolonged digital screen usage has been linked to other problems as well.

Nearsightedness, for example, appears to be a common issue in those who stare at screens all day. Low melatonin levels have also been found in excessive digital screen users, a problem linked to the circadian rhythm in which blue light from screens tricks our body into thinking it’s still daytime at night, reducing tiredness before bed and increased fatigue when waking up in the morning.

As it would seem, there’s tons of evidence suggesting that it’s best for you to put down the digital screen occasionally. After all, humans weren’t designed to stare at digital screens all day.

About the Author
  • Fascinated by scientific discoveries and media, Anthony found his way here at LabRoots, where he would be able to dabble in the two. Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.
You May Also Like
DEC 05, 2019
Genetics & Genomics
DEC 05, 2019
Detecting DNA - Without Amplification
As genetic technologies rapidly advance, totally new approaches are now possible. One innovation is the CRISPR-Chip....
DEC 05, 2019
Technology
DEC 05, 2019
GymCam Can Track Exercise Effectively Than Wearable Sensors
Gadgets for fitness, in particular wearable sensors, have motivated how we exercise but may not always capture all exercises equally—as recent resear...
DEC 05, 2019
Technology
DEC 05, 2019
Robotic Skin?
Scientists have discovered a multifunctional ultra-thin wearable electronic device with imperceptible properties to the user. The device can be thought of ...
DEC 05, 2019
Clinical & Molecular DX
DEC 05, 2019
AcroMetrix BCR-ABL External Molecular Panel: An Accurate Testing Method for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
To support the validation and verification of new assays in oncology testing, Thermo Fisher Scientific with AcroMetrix control products provides innov...
DEC 05, 2019
Technology
DEC 05, 2019
How to design robots with flexible bodies?
Scientists at MIT develop an efficient way to optimize and control the design of soft robots in order to complete complex tasks. "Soft robots are infi...
DEC 05, 2019
Technology
DEC 05, 2019
How artificial intelligence (AI) is improving immunotherapy
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University’s digital imaging lab are pioneering the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to predict the efficacy o...
Loading Comments...