MAR 20, 2019 12:14 PM PDT

Chronoprinting: Detecting Food and Drug Fraudulence

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

Food and drug fraud is a global problem often affecting individuals in low-income regions and jeopardize the health and lives of their consumers.

Detecting counterfeit or adulterated drugs and foods will not only save money but lives as well. Current fraud/fake detecting technological methods are expensive, energy-intensive, and largely unavailable other needed regions. To address this issue, researchers at the University of California engineered a simple new technique that can detect fake drugs from a video taken as the sample undergoes a disturbance.

The technique is called "chronoprinting” and is similar to online photo tools used in image analysis algorithms for categorizing photos. Chronoprinting can inexpensively and accurately distinguish between pure samples from samples of inferior food and medicines—it is the unique connection between chemistry and computer science. Specifically, pure samples had a reliable chronoprint over multiple tests versus adulterated samples that produced different chronoprints.

"The significant visual differences between the samples were both unexpected and exciting, and with them being consistent we knew this could be a useful way to identify a wide range of samples," says doctoral student, Brittney McKenzie.

Findings of chronoprinting are presented in ACS Central Science and supported by grants from the National Science Foundation.

"By basically converting a chemical sample to an image, we can take advantage of all the different image analysis algorithms that computer scientists have developed," says William Grover, an assistant professor of bioengineering in UC Riverside's Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering. "And as those algorithms get better, our ability to chemically identify a sample should get better, too."

Learn more about chronoprinting:

Source: ScienceDaily

 

About the Author
  • Nouran enjoys writing on various topics including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
JAN 22, 2020
Neuroscience
JAN 22, 2020
Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Now Possible
Enthusiasm for the development of direct brain-to-brain communication has long been held by futurists as well as military enthusiasts. Although once a dist...
JAN 22, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 22, 2020
Could the Successful Juno Mission See an Extension Beyond 2021?
The Juno mission, launched by NASA in 2011 to explore the fascinating Jovian system, finally arrived at its destination in 2016. Since then, the spacecraft...
JAN 22, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 22, 2020
Spacewalking Astronauts Attempt to Fix AMS-02's Cooling System
When you’re an astronaut at the International Space Station, being asked to take on risky spacewalk missions is par for the course. In just the last...
JAN 22, 2020
Technology
JAN 22, 2020
Engineering Silk into Medical Devices
Scientists at Tufts University created an effective fabrication method for molding silk into medical devices. Silk is a biopolymer long known for its super...
JAN 22, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 22, 2020
Boeing Launches Botched Starliner Demo Mission for NASA
Boeing finally moved forward with the initial un-crewed test launch of its Starliner Commercial Crew spacecraft for NASA at the end of this past week follo...
JAN 22, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 22, 2020
Why NASA's Artemis Mission is So Important
If you’ve been following NASA, then you’ve undoubtedly heard about the American space agency’s Artemis mission. Artemis is all about laun...
Loading Comments...