APR 15, 2019 05:04 PM PDT

Sensor Tracks Chemicals Effectively After Neurotrauma

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

 

Glutamate, a chemical messenger in the brain, can spike to toxic levels following spinal cord injury that can lead to migraines. The need to catch split-second of glutamate spike in action and follow its path of destruction is the basis of a research study by Purdue University engineers who have developed an implantable glutamate sensor.

Although the implantable sensor was primarily for research on animal models, it could be used for future clinical use. For example, the sensor could be used to monitor whether a drug for neurotrauma or brain disease is effective.

An implantable sensor has the speed and precision for tracking a brain chemical known to be elevated in certain brain diseases and after a spinal cord injury. (Purdue University image/Tran Nguyen)

“When you feel like you’re running a fever, it doesn’t matter when you check your temperature – it will probably be the same for several hours. But a glutamate spike is so fast that if you don’t capture it at that moment, you miss the whole opportunity to get data,” said Riyi Shi, a professor of neuroscience and biomedical engineering in Purdue’s Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering.

When researchers implanted the device into the spinal cord of injured animal model of neurotrama, they were able to capture a spike much more efficiently than current devices.

Results of the study were published in Biosensors and Bioelectronics.

New sensor technology implanted in animal models can help researchers understand the role that the brain chemical glutamate plays in neurotrauma, advising more specialized treatment. (Purdue University image/Tran Nguyen)

“We wanted to create a low-cost and very fast way to build these sensors so that we can easily provide researchers with a means to measure glutamate levels in vivo,” said Hugh Lee, a Purdue assistant professor of biomedical engineering.

Source: Purdue University

About the Author
  • Nouran enjoys writing on various topics including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
JAN 22, 2020
Technology
JAN 22, 2020
Mesh: New Computer Memory Compacting System
Internet browsers and smartphone apps use a lot of memory which often affect the efficiency of other critical applications particularly programs written in...
JAN 22, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
JAN 22, 2020
Scientists Bolstered Water-based Hydrogen Production with a 10-Dollar Magnet
Hydrogen is dubbed the clean energy of the future because its consumption leads to no carbon emission but only water. But things are not always what they s...
JAN 22, 2020
Space & Astronomy
JAN 22, 2020
Hayabusa-2 Departs Ryugu Asteroid to Return to Earth with Samples
It’s been just over a year since JAXA’s renowned Hayabusa-2 mission arrived at asteroid 162173 Ryugu to study the dynamics of the distant space...
JAN 22, 2020
Chemistry & Physics
JAN 22, 2020
Scientists Observed the Root Cause of Lithium Batteries Failures in Real Time
Lithium batteries have high energy storage capacity, but sometimes they have unexpected failures and can even cause a fire. A team of scientists at the Dep...
JAN 22, 2020
Technology
JAN 22, 2020
Can artificial intelligence increase tuberculosis drug development?
It’s no secret that there is a shortage of tuberculosis drug development. To combat this issue, researchers at the University of Michigan designed a ...
JAN 22, 2020
Technology
JAN 22, 2020
Integrating Deep Learning for Online Shopping
As the holiday season approaches an end, all of us are familiar with online shopping. To shop on websites, we typically string a few words together to sear...
Loading Comments...