APR 24, 2019 11:21 PM PDT

Photoacoustic endoscopy could improve Crohn's disease treatment

WRITTEN BY: Nouran Amin

In a study published in the journal Biomedical Optics Express, researchers have developed a capsule-shaped photoacoustic imaging endoscope that can allow physicians to have a better view of intestinal changes caused by Crohn's disease in affected patients—such information can advance treatment options.

Caption: Researchers developed an endoscope that can perform photoacoustic imaging. The new device could give doctors a better view of intestinal changes caused by Crohn’s disease. Credit: Guan Xu, University of Michigan

"This new imaging technology could help more accurately plan therapy for each Crohn's disease patient," said Guan Xu, leader of the research team. "This would allow more targeted treatment and help minimize any adverse effects that might result from treatment."

The technology from the University of Michigan is used for photoacoustic imaging—a relatively novel biomedical imaging technique that uses light to produce sound waves in tissue which can be captured with ultrasound imaging.

Crohn disease leads to the development of strictures in the intestines which is caused by inflammation and fibrosis. Although the strictures that are a result of inflammation--can be treated with drugs, the strictures caused by fibrosis must be surgically removed.

"Currently, there is no imaging modality that can be used in the intestine to distinguish inflammation from fibrosis," said Xu. "The difficulty in accurately assessing the presence and development of fibrosis in the strictures adds a great deal of complexity to Crohn's disease management decisions."

The novel endoscope was tested on rabbit models and can examine whether the imaging technique could be used to characterize inflammation and fibrosis in intestinal strictures. It was designed to deliver infrared light at 1310 nanometers which allows to be absorbed by the collagen protein causing to expand lightly—a characteristic of feature of fibrosis.

"The method we demonstrated is minimally invasive and can directly assess fibrosis in the intestinal stricture, which has not been demonstrated by conventional medical imaging modalities," said Xu.

Source: Science Daily

 

About the Author
  • Nouran enjoys writing on various topics including science & medicine, global health, and conservation biology. She hopes through her writing she can make science more engaging and communicable to the general public.
You May Also Like
MAR 20, 2019
Chemistry & Physics
MAR 20, 2019
Learn How Firefighters Extinguish High-Risk Aircraft Fires
Aircraft fires aren’t anything like a traditional building fire; the stakes are much higher, and the firefighters who combat them need to be speciall...
APR 22, 2019
Earth & The Environment
APR 22, 2019
Using kites to harness wind energy
A research team at the University of Madrid is intent on harnessing the wind with unconventional means: huge kites. Using the kites that one might otherwis...
APR 24, 2019
Drug Discovery
APR 24, 2019
Nanomachine Improves Drug Delivery for Cancer Therapeutics
Recent studies on mice has allowed researchers to find a way to deliver specific drugs to certain parts of the body that are exceptionally difficult to acc...
MAY 21, 2019
Space & Astronomy
MAY 21, 2019
The Science Behind the Black Hole-Spying Event Horizon Telescope
Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably heard the recent news regarding the publication of the first real image of a black hole...
MAY 24, 2019
Chemistry & Physics
MAY 24, 2019
The Battery of the Future Can Power a City Block
Lithium-ion batteries are playing an indispensable role in our everyday life, powering up everything from a cellphone to a pickup truck. But for cities of...
MAY 23, 2019
Technology
MAY 23, 2019
Blossom: The Customizable Social Robot
A new social robot, that is simple, expressive, inexpensive and referred to as ‘Blossom’, can soon help teach fourth graders mathematics. Bloss...
Loading Comments...